2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers

February 2017 | 2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Playing with Tempo Changes

by Samara Atkins

Tip 1: When you’re building up choreographic phrases, repetition is key to students’ understanding of the sequencing. Repeating a section several times, breaking down the more difficult moves as you go, helps students remember what you’re teaching.
Tip 2: Playing with tempo changes is also helpful once you’ve taught the entire phrase.

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November 2016 | 2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Essential Moves: Crisscross

by Samara Atkins

Tip 1
The crisscross is an essential element of the hip-hop vocabulary. Funky and stylish, it’s a great move to be able to pull out, whether in choreography, freestyle, or battles.

Tip 2
When students have the foot patterns down, have them add a body roll in reverse (rolling upward from knees to head).

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October 2016 | 2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Sitting in the Pocket

Tip 1
Teaching musicality can be harder than teaching moves. An especially difficult skill is “sitting in the pocket,” stretching a move to fill the space (or pocket) between counts. Mastering this skill (also called “finding the groove” or “riding out the beat”) is important to hip-hop’s style, flow, and execution.
Tip 2
To help students learn this skill, vary your intonation when counting, drawn out where students should sit in the pocket and sharp where they should end it: “Ooone, twooo. . . ” or “Ooone, two! Threee, four!”

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September 2016 | 2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Spins as Accents

Tip 1
Spins or turns are great “punctuation” elements to introduce into students’ vocabularies. Spins can accent a specific beat or the end of a phrase, and they look cool, whether in choreography or freestyle. There are many turns you can teach to add dynamic motion to students’ dancing.
Tip 2
Pencil turns are another good accent. Begin with feet shoulder-width apart, arms loosely at the sides. Bend the knees, jump the feet together and wrap the arms tightly around the torso to create momentum, and spin the body 360 degrees in either direction. Spin up on both toes, keeping weight distributed between the feet. Tell students to look as narrow as possible, as if squeezing into a tight space.

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August 2016 | 2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Introducing Freestyle

Tip 1
Freestyling (improvising) has been around since long before hip-hop began, making dance come alive on street corners and at parties. In recent years freestyling has become increasingly important in the hip-hop world—it’s a major component of the urban street dance movement—mostly because it encourages so much spontaneous creativity. New freestyle moves come out of experimenting or trial and error; trending moves, like the Dougie or the dab, are often born from someone’s take on a preexisting move. The basic concept is doing whatever comes to mind while listening to a song and letting your movement be completely free.

Tip 2
Impromptu and improvised, freestyling gives dancers creative control over their bodies—and that can make students nervous. Framing freestyling as an activity or task can help them feel more comfortable exploring their own movement. For example, ask students to freestyle for 16 counts at certain points within set choreography, perhaps during the intro or at the end, and either individually or all together.

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July 2016 | 2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Beginners’ Dive and the Dodger

Tip 1 I’ve previously described the dive (“Two Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers: Drop-Freeze and Dolphin Dive,” March-April 2015), a house dance move. Here’s a basic version for beginners.

Tip 2 To teach the dodger, another house dance move, have students stand with the torso and weight shifted toward the left, left knee slightly bent. The right foot is on the ball, slightly behind the left; the right shoulder is angled forward. In this move, the shoulders always move in opposition to the working leg.

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May-June 2016 | 2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Explosive Movement and Social Dancing

Tip 1
An explosive quality (driven by the energy of the music) is inherent to hip-hop. The ability to execute explosive movements—sudden, decisive, and fast—makes a dancer stand out onstage.
Tip 2
Encourage students to dance with each other in public as well as in class. While the studio is a great starting point, hip-hop dance is an art form that can be fully realized only when danced as a community, in a social setting.

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March-April 2016 | 2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Back Spin and Sweep

Tip 1
The back spin is a good introduction to understanding and controlling centripetal force. It’s often done from a footwork position, but to teach it, start on the floor.
Tip 2
The sweep is a great foundational move for beginner b-boys/b-girls. Begin in a squat, right leg out straight to the diagonal, left hand on the floor for stability. Sweeping the right leg across the front to the left, shift weight to the right hand. Hopping off the floor with the bent left leg, sweep the right leg underneath. Sweeping the right leg behind the body, shift weight back to the left hand and leg. Tell students to keep the sweeping leg straight as long as possible, and to push strongly off the floor so the straight leg can skip cleanly under the bent leg with no trip-ups. Repeat on the left. For a continuous sweep, keep the same leg traveling around the body.

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February 2016 | 2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Two Choreography Strategies

Tip 1
Individuality is essential in hip-hop. While students need to know how to pick up and execute other people’s choreography, they also need strategies for generating their own movement. Try these exercises to get students’ brains working and creativity flowing. Allot plenty of time, and end with performances and a critique session. As they work, students may find it helpful to jot down steps in a notebook.
Tip 2
Choreograph by “cutting and pasting”: students generate short sequences, then identify beginning, middle, and end sections. They cut apart and rearrange these sections—for example, moving the end to the beginning or the middle to the end.

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January 2016 | 2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Arm Wave and Slowing Down

Tip 1
The wave starts from the fingertips of one hand and travels across arms and shoulders to end in the fingertips of the other. Have students start in a T position—arms out and level with the floor. Tell them to keep a mental image of this position; it will help them hold a clear shape that shows off the wave’s progress.
Tip 2
Students need to learn when and how to create accents—to “stop on a dime” or “hit” a move’s maximum energy—to perform successfully. Usually, accents match sounds in the music, and both dance and music move fast. But that doesn’t mean hip-hop choreography must be taught at fast tempos. Students need to connect to movement and music at a slower pace first, to maintain technique, fine-tune details, discover nuances, and learn to sharpen moves by accenting the music.

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December 2015 | 2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Geometry and Fundamentals

Tip 1
If students tend to focus internally or stay in one spot while freestyling, or if choreography isn’t moving around the room as planned, turning basic geometric shapes into pathways can help. This exercise encourages students to focus outward and frees their bodies to travel.
Tip 2
Students can feel overwhelmed when asked to improvise. Focusing on dance fundamentals, basic aspects of movement shared by all dance forms, can help.

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November 2015 | 2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Camel Walk and Patty Duke

Tip 1
Many of the hip-hop steps we teach come out of popular dances. The camel walk and Patty Duke, for example, are based on 1970s dances that influenced the social aspect of hip-hop’s development. Since these steps started as party dances, have students face each other and interact to get into the right spirit.

Tip 2
There are a few versions of the Patty Duke; here’s one. Stand on two feet, shoulder-width apart, and start the groove, a body rock going backward. Bring one foot forward, leaving the weight on the back foot, to tap the floor on the accented beat. Return to two feet and rock, then tap with the other foot. Repeat.

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October 2015 | 2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Box Step and 360-Degree Dancing

The box step is a basic step in many styles. In hip-hop, it was popular with early b-boys/b-girls and lofters.

Most hip-hop dance is done inside a cypher. Dancers address the people around them with their movements, dance together, or dance at each other in battle. Make sure your students think about dancing in 360 degrees. If they always face forward in the studio, their dancing will stay too flat.

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September 2015 | 2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Cross-Training and Knee Drop

We typically think about dancing for exercise, but what about exercising for dance? Hip-hop requires strength and stamina, but dancers who start off in the street (like me) may have no prior physical training. Some students struggle to keep up in class because they lack conditioning, not rhythm or ability to pick up steps.

The knee drop is a common but impressive transition to the floor. (Jerkers call it a pin drop.)

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August 2015 | 2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Hand Styles and Backslide

Hands play a major role in hip-hop dance and can say a lot about a dancer, displaying personality and performance style, showing confidence, and telling a story.

To teach the backslide, have students start with their weight on the left leg. The right knee is bent with the heel raised and the ball of the foot planted.

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July 2015 | 2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Freezes and Levels

Freezes (also called pauses or poses) are the moments in breaking when the dancer stops all movement—as if frozen in time. Freezes can happen at any point and must be held with confidence.

The use of levels—high, middle, and low—is one of the fundamental elements of dance.

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November 2014 | 2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Stance and Style

Before doing any hip-hop moves with students, work on their stance, which embodies hip-hop’s attitude and style. Compared to jazz and ballet, the body is looser and more relaxed, with rounded shoulders, soft knees, and feet in parallel. I tell kids to place a finger on the belly button, then contract like a deflating balloon. (Making deflating sound effects helps!) Emphasize imagining their strength and energy being pushed into the ground—I use the image of feeling your feet sink into wet sand.

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October 2014 | 2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Battles and Nae Naes

Shows can be more fun if the audience gets involved in the action. So how about holding a hip-hop battle at your next recital? The fun starts with a great emcee to keep the audience engaged and motivated. When there’s a break for a costume change, have the emcee ask for two volunteers from the audience to take part in a hip-hop dance contest onstage. The emcee should have one or two simple steps prepared to show the participants, such as the Dougie or the Nae Nae (see below); or simply have them freestyle.

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