Humor & Heartstrings

January 2011 | Humor & Heartstrings

Tay Camille Lynne had two thoughts just before the car hit her. One, if her legs broke, she could not dance; two, a move from modern class she’d just learned the week before. Instinctively, she used the simple floor roll to move up the hood of the car and off the side. “It saved me from serious injury and quite possibly saved my life,” Tay says.

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Humor & Heartstrings | November 09

I have taught dance off and on for eons. Years ago, a class of new kindergartners and I were taking a break, sitting and pointing and flexing our toes. One little blond cherub informed me that her feet were “so tired.” I asked her what she did at school that day to make them so tired. She stood up, hands on little hips, and, looking very serious, replied, “What do you expect? I have been walking on these feet for five years!”

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Humor & Heartstrings | August 09

When 3-year-old Madison Sugg’s mother took her into the handicapped bathroom, her eyes widened and she squealed with delight: “Look, Mom, there’s a ballet barre in here.”

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Humor & Heartstrings | March/April 09

I was teaching a musical-theater camp over the summer and one day I took two of the younger students to the bathroom. Both girls are 4 years old, and they left their stall doors open in order to engage me in conversation. One of the girls decided that she needed to educate me about the differences between boys and girls, so she told me all about how her daddy and brother have “wieners” and how they have to go to the bathroom standing up, but that girls have to sit down. She then told me how her baby brother will someday have a “wiener” too! It was very hard to control my laughter. I never thought that as a dance teacher I would hear something so “educational” and funny from a 4-year-old.

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Humor and Heartstrings | January 09

“I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for Richard’s School of Dance, one nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.” This child also has a hard time pronouncing her Rs, so “Richard’s” came out like “Which-ards.” The principal called to let me know that our school should feel pretty important that day!

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