Dance Studio Life Dedicated to Quality Dance Education 2017-01-24T00:34:25Z http://www.dancestudiolife.com/feed/atom/ WordPress http://www.dancestudiolife.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/cropped-icon-512-32x32.jpg Rhee Gold <![CDATA[January 2017 | Rules = Respect]]> http://www.dancestudiolife.com/?p=47725 2017-01-24T00:28:24Z 2017-01-22T23:52:28Z Rhee Gold <![CDATA[January 2017 | Ask Rhee Gold]]> http://www.dancestudiolife.com/?p=47554 2017-01-20T22:50:00Z 2017-01-19T22:49:29Z Rhee Gold <![CDATA[January 2017 | Bright Biz Idea | Concessions Convenience]]> http://www.dancestudiolife.com/?p=47544 2017-01-24T00:29:30Z 2017-01-18T22:46:26Z Rhee Gold <![CDATA[January 2017 | 2 Tips for Modern & Contemporary Teachers | Eye Contact in Partnering and Safe, Silent Rolls]]> http://www.dancestudiolife.com/?p=47539 2017-01-21T01:09:25Z 2017-01-17T22:45:14Z Tip 1: When teaching young dancers the basics of partnering, make sure to stress the importance of focus. Tip 2: Teaching students the correct way to make contact with the floor when they roll from a standing position will help them to execute this common move effectively while avoiding injury.]]> Rhee Gold <![CDATA[January 2017 | Going Global]]> http://www.dancestudiolife.com/?p=47528 2017-01-24T00:34:25Z 2017-01-16T14:12:20Z Rhee Gold <![CDATA[January 2017 | EditorSpeak]]> http://www.dancestudiolife.com/?p=47489 2017-01-24T00:32:48Z 2017-01-13T17:18:25Z Rhee Gold <![CDATA[January 2017 | On My Mind]]> http://www.dancestudiolife.com/?p=47483 2017-01-21T01:18:00Z 2017-01-12T17:21:39Z Rhee Gold <![CDATA[January 2017 | Teaching Traditions]]> http://www.dancestudiolife.com/?p=47475 2017-01-24T00:30:23Z 2017-01-11T05:01:45Z ho‘onana, ho‘olohe, ho‘opili (“watch,” “listen,” “imitate”). Whatever the craft, the idea is the same: find a master, open your eyes and ears, and if you don’t get it quite right, trust your teacher to correct you.]]> Rhee Gold <![CDATA[January 2017 | 2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Making Tap Dances]]> http://www.dancestudiolife.com/?p=47470 2017-01-21T01:06:50Z 2017-01-10T17:25:50Z Rhee Gold <![CDATA[January 2017 | Language of the Heart]]> http://www.dancestudiolife.com/?p=47458 2017-01-24T00:31:06Z 2017-01-09T05:01:55Z Rhee Gold <![CDATA[January 2017 | FYI]]> http://www.dancestudiolife.com/?p=47449 2017-01-20T22:41:11Z 2017-01-06T17:32:36Z Rhee Gold <![CDATA[January 2017 | Moving Images]]> http://www.dancestudiolife.com/?p=47425 2017-01-20T22:31:50Z 2017-01-05T05:01:44Z Rhee Gold <![CDATA[January 2017 | Page Turners]]> http://www.dancestudiolife.com/?p=47421 2017-01-20T22:31:35Z 2017-01-05T05:01:03Z Eight Female Classical Ballet Variations 2.Little Sap and Monsieur Rodin 3.José! Born to Dance 4.Swing Time]]> Rhee Gold <![CDATA[January 2017 | Igniting the Soul]]> http://www.dancestudiolife.com/?p=47402 2017-01-24T00:31:39Z 2017-01-04T05:01:35Z Rhee Gold <![CDATA[January 2017 | 2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | Height and Control in Grand Jeté]]> http://www.dancestudiolife.com/?p=47371 2017-01-20T22:36:58Z 2017-01-03T05:01:13Z Tip 1 The grand jeté is one of ballet’s most rewarding steps, for both the audience and the dancer. The ability to propel oneself from one foot into the air, reach a perfect split, then land on the other foot, all while showing grace and ease in the upper body, is a hallmark of excellent ballet technique. However, I often see students sacrificing jump height to achieve perfect splits. To address this tendency, tell students to throw the leading leg first, as if hurdling over a barrel. Ask them to battement above 90 degrees upon takeoff—this will help them get air time rather than jumping straight forward, which gives an appearance of “flatlining” in the air. Tip 2 Don’t overlook the grand jeté’s landing; in terms of student safety, it is the step’s most important aspect. Properly turned out placement of the standing leg is a must, as any turning in puts extra stress on the knee’s tendons. Try this simple combination to help students develop correct landings. Start in tendu devant, traveling downstage, directly en face to the studio mirror. (This allows students to observe their own landings.) Chassé, grand jeté, and land in attitude derrière with the same arm in fifth and the other in à la seconde (two counts). Hold the attitude landing (four counts), then step back to tendu devant (two counts). Repeat on the other side. Once students can land on one leg, turned out and in control—no hopping or fidgeting—have them increase the height of the takeoff battement, but without sacrificing the amount of control they exhibited in the landing previously. This encourages them both to jump higher and to land with more control. ]]> Rhee Gold <![CDATA[January 2017 | Bulletin Board]]> http://www.dancestudiolife.com/?p=47364 2017-01-20T22:24:52Z 2017-01-02T05:01:18Z Rhee Gold <![CDATA[January 2017 | Performance Corner]]> http://www.dancestudiolife.com/?p=47440 2017-01-13T17:39:44Z 2017-01-01T17:34:28Z Rhee Gold <![CDATA[January 2017 | A World of Dance]]> http://www.dancestudiolife.com/?p=47358 2017-01-23T23:58:26Z 2017-01-01T05:01:00Z Rhee Gold <![CDATA[December 2016 | Hip-Hop Dance | Table of Contents]]> http://www.dancestudiolife.com/?p=47025 2017-01-03T22:05:44Z 2016-12-02T04:59:06Z Rhee Gold <![CDATA[December 2016 | EditorSpeak]]> http://www.dancestudiolife.com/?p=47169 2016-12-13T00:42:47Z 2016-12-02T00:39:24Z