Dance Studio Life Magazine
Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for our Email Newsletter

Posts Tagged ‘dance studio life’

July 2014 Dance Studio Life

Share

 

Dance Studio Life, a magazine with a back-to-basics approach, is a division of the Rhee Gold Company, whose mission is to be at the forefront of dance and education by promoting the highest possible standards in teaching. Dance Studio Life understands the soul of the teaching field.

Dance Studio Life February 2014

 

COLUMNS
Ask Rhee Gold
Advice for dance teachers
2 Music Tips for Dance Teachers | Quality and Dynamics By Nina Pinzarrone
2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | Preparing for Big Jumps By David Arce
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Holiday Helpers By Geo Hubela
2 Tips for Modern Teachers | Undercurves, Overcurves By Bill Evans
2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Walk-Arounds and New Styles By Thelma Goldberg
College Close-Ups |Grand Valley State University
What students need to know about college and university dance programs.
EditorSpeak By Cheryl A. Ossola
FYI
What’s Up In the dance community
On My Mind | Words from the Publisher By Rhee Gold

DEPARTMENTS
Classroom Connection By Holly Derville-Teer and Kerry Ring
Ideas to incorporate into your curriculum
Mail
Words from our readers
Mindful Marketing | Focus on Faculty With Standout Bios By Lisa Okuhn
Teacher in the Spotlight | Mary Frangione
Teachers who make a difference  
Thinking Out Loud | Mixed Messages By Melanie Gibbs

FEATURES 
Ballet Scene | A Sensory-Sensitive Show By Rita Felciano
Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre’s autism-friendly Nutcracker.
Bright Biz Idea | Three Sources, One (Income) Stream By Jennifer Kaplan
Diversifying helps profits flow.
Dancing on the Pier By Elizabeth Zimmer
Tens of thousands of children got a taste of the limelight in Atlantic City with Tony Grant Stars of Tomorrow.
From Swing to Hoedown By Joseph Carman
Youth dance teams modeled on the Aggie Wranglers lasso audiences with country-and-western dance.Holiday
Classics Retold With a Kick By Holly Derville-Teer, Larry Sousa, and Karen White
Rhee in Retrospect By Karen White
Dance Studio Life’s 10th anniversary brings memories of 50 years in dance.
The Dance Studio Life “Generous Heart” Awards By Cheryl A. Ossola, Lisa Okuhn, Arisa White, and Karen White
6 who innovate, influence, inform, and inspire.
With the Greatest of Ease By Mary Ellen Hunt
At a dance and circus arts school, students spin, stretch, and fly.

Share

May-June 2014 Dance Studio Life

Share

Dance Studio Life, a magazine with a back-to-basics approach, is a division of the Rhee Gold Company, whose mission is to be at the forefront of dance and education by promoting the highest possible standards in teaching. Dance Studio Life understands the soul of the teaching field.

Dance Studio Life May-June 2014

 

COLUMNS
Ask Rhee Gold
Advice for dance teachers
2 Music Tips for Dance Teachers | Tempo By Nina Pinzarrone
2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | Polished Pirouettes By David Arce
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Cross-Touch and Moon Walk By Geo Hubela
2 Tips for Modern Teachers | Balanced Rotation By Bill Evans
2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Spiced-Up Choreography By Thelma Goldberg
College Close-Ups | Cornish College of the Arts
What students need to know about college and university dance programs.
EditorSpeak By Karen White and Lisa Okuhn
FYI What’s Up In the dance community
On My Mind | Words from the Publisher By Rhee Gold

DEPARTMENTS
Classroom Connection By Sarah Beth Byrum and Debbie Werbrouck
Ideas to incorporate into your curriculum
Mail
Words from our readers
Mindful Marketing | Target Audiences
By Misty Lown
Teacher in the Spotlight | Charlotte Barron-Jones
Teachers who make a difference  
Thinking Out Loud | Senioritis, School-Owner Style By Hedy Perna

FEATURES 
Ballet Scene | Shuffles and Chasses By Ryan P. Casey
Tap meets ballet at Thomas Armour Youth Ballet, and the results are anything but mixed.
Before the Goodbye By Roxanne Claire
Strategies to engage and keep students who say they aren’t jazzed about dance.
Bright Biz Idea | Time vs Money By Karen White
How school owners can manage their time to yield the most value.
Come Together By Megan Donahue
How to make staff meetings pay off.
Higher-Ed Voice | “C” Is for Choice By Bonner Odell
College, conservatory, or a hybrid? How to parse the options in post-secondary dance education.
In With the New By Lea Marshall
How to take over a school without the trauma of transition.
Pay-What-You-Can in Paradise By Jennifer Kaplan
On the island of Maui, a donation-based school emphasizes community and opportunity.
So Long, Nest Egg, Hello Dance By Lois Burch O’Brian
How two dance lovers tapped into their retirement time and money and bought a school.
Straight Talk
10 competition judges offer wisdom and wish lists.
Teaching Top Talent By Marybeth Kemp
More is better when it comes to training exceptional students.

Share

February 2014 Dance Studio Life

Share

Dance Studio Life, a magazine with a back-to-basics approach, is a division of the Rhee Gold Company, whose mission is to be at the forefront of dance and education by promoting the highest possible standards in teaching. Dance Studio Life understands the soul of the teaching field.

Dance Studio Life February 2014COLUMNS
Ask Rhee Gold
Advice for dance teachers
2 Music Tips for Dance Teachers | Notation Basics By Nina Pinzarrone
2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | Rules of Ballet By David Arce
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Let’s Tut By Geo Hubela
2 Tips for Modern Teachers | Balance and Functions By Bill Evans
2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Rudiments: Fundamentals of Footwork By Thelma Goldberg
College Close-Ups | Hope College
What students need to know about college and university dance programs.
EditorSpeak By Cheryl Ossola
FYI What’s Up In the dance community
On My Mind | Words from the Publisher By Rhee Gold

DEPARTMENTS
Classroom Connection By Holly Derville-Teer and Debra Danese
Ideas to incorporate into your curriculum
Mail
Words from our readers

Mindful Marketing | Make It Mobile By Kevin Ekmark
Teacher in the Spotlight | Lauren Kipphut
Teachers who make a difference  
Thinking Out Loud | Hats Off to Carolyn By Nancy Stone

FEATURES 
Ballet Scene | Fairrie’s Fitness By Joseph Carman
British-schooled Fiona Fairrie is in demand as a “fix-it” teacher.
Bright Biz Idea | On a Mission By Lisa Okuhn
How and why to put your philosophy and goals into writing.
Higher-Ed Voice | The Adelphi-Taylor Connection By Rachel Berman 
One dance department’s unique relationship with Paul Taylor Dance Company.
J.U.i.C.E.-d Up in L.A. By Rita Felciano
Hip-hop collective offers support and encourages creativity.
Schools with Staying Power | Earthbound and Airborne By Steve Sucato
Long’s School of Dance maintains traditions while moving beyond them.
Something New for Summer | Mozart to Mahler By Mary Ellen Hunt
Teaching musicality means going beyond counts and steps.
Something New for Summer | Teaching the Whole Child By Julia Holt Lucia
A summer session to boost mind as well as body.
Something New for Summer | Two Modes for Better Movement By Ann Murphy
Introducing students to Pilates and Gyrokinesis.
Summertime Teacher Training
Your guide to workshops and intensives across the U.S. and beyond.

Share

January 2014 Dance Studio Life

Share

Dance Studio Life, a magazine with a back-to-basics approach, is a division of the Rhee Gold Company, whose mission is to be at the forefront of dance and education by promoting the highest possible standards in teaching. Dance Studio Life understands the soul of the teaching field.

 

January 2014COLUMNS
Ask Rhee Gold
Advice for dance teachers
2 Music Tips for Dance Teachers | Exercises for Musicality By Nina Pinzarrone
2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | Airborne By David Arce
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Rock to the Beat By Geo Hubela
2 Tips for Modern Teachers | Shape and Process By Bill Evans
2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Step In Time By Thelma Goldberg
College Close-Ups | Jacksonville University
What students need to know about college and university dance programs.
EditorSpeak By Cheryl Ossola
FYI
What’s Up In the dance community

On My Mind | Words from the Publisher By Rhee Gold

DEPARTMENTS
Classroom Connection By Dawn Freeman and Karen White
Ideas to incorporate into your curriculum
Mail
Words from our readers

Mindful Marketing | Power of Perks By Meghan Seaman
Teacher in the Spotlight | Jessica Starr
Teachers who make a difference  
Thinking Out Loud | Heads Held High By Jennifer Moore Aguilar

FEATURES 
Ballet Scene | Crazy for Ballet By Claudia Bauer
The basics of building a program for boys.
Bright Biz Idea | Finding the “Vital Few” By Misty Lown
What a turn-of-the-20th-century principle of economics means to you.
Dance Theatre Goes Global By Rita Felciano
Kid-driven Mudd Butt Mystery Theatre Troupe gets inventive with dance.
Heat, Horton and Happiness By Karen White
One dance teacher’s transformative trip to Haiti.
Johannesburg to Oakland By Toba Singer
How South African dance landed at Laney College.

Living Traditions By Mary Ellen Hunt
In Native American dance, what’s old is eternal – and always relevant.
Mixing It Up By Joseph Carman
World dances, lindy hop, and Denishawn – Vanaver Caravan does it all.
Schools with Staying Power | Making Memories in Mobile By Lea Marshall
Sheffield School of the Dance’s three generations of dance lovers.
Who’s In Charge By Elizabeth McLain
When kids call the shots in class, chaos reigns.
  

Share

December 2013 Dance Studio Life

Share

Dance Studio Life, a magazine with a back-to-basics approach, is a division of the Rhee Gold Company, whose mission is to be at the forefront of dance and education by promoting the highest possible standards in teaching. Dance Studio Life understands the soul of the teaching field.

 

December 2013COLUMNS
Ask Rhee Gold
Advice for dance teachers
2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | Better Balance By David Arce
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Way to Pop By Geo Hubela
2 Tips for Modern Teachers | Get Grounded By Bill Evans
2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Building on Basics By Gregg Russell
A Better You | Thoughts to Carry With You By Suzanne Martin, PT, DPT
What to remember to be the best ‘you’ ever.
EditorSpeak By Cheryl Ossola and Karen White
FYI
What’s Up In the dance community
On My Mind | Words from the Publisher By Rhee Gold

DEPARTMENTS
Classroom Connection By Megan Donahue and Karen White
Ideas to incorporate into your curriculum
Mail
Words from our readers
Mindful Marketing | Online Integrity By Julia Holt Lucia
Teacher in the Spotlight | Staciann Marcucci
Teachers who make a difference  
Thinking Out Loud | Five Lessons By Joan F. Smith

FEATURES 
Ballet Scene | Sharing the Love, Shaping the Mind By Melanie Gibbs
How to make ballet fun for kids who resist it.
Bright Biz Idea | Two for One By Mary Ellen Hunt
Cooperation is key in merger of two studios.
Chatting With Chet By Karen White
Jacob’s Pillow musical-theater master talks shows and shop.
From Injury to Inspiration By Ryan P. Casey
How a tap syllabus was born and what it can do for tappers everywhere.
Fundamentally Hip-Hop By Ann Murphy
3 arts activists speak to schoolchildren through dance.
Get Out and Dance! 
Competitions and conventions for schools of every size, taste, and budget.

Higher-Ed Voice | Dancers Without Borders By Bonner Odell
Discovering the power of dance service in Panama.
Hip-Hop for All By Geo Hubela
Teaching methods that suit every student.
Hip-Hop for Tykes By Megan Donahue
Cool moves and lots of action for the preschool set.
Tap From the Heart By Ryan P. Casey
How to put meaning, emotion, and story into tap dance.
Tap’s Past Made Present By Andrew J. Nemr
Tap-dance memorabilia may find a home in a new museum.
  

Share

November 2013 Dance Studio Life

Share

Dance Studio Life, a magazine with a back-to-basics approach, is a division of the Rhee Gold Company, whose mission is to be at the forefront of dance and education by promoting the highest possible standards in teaching. Dance Studio Life understands the soul of the teaching field.

 

Dance Studio Life November 2013COLUMNS
Ask Rhee Gold Advice for dance teachers
2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | Super Stretches By David Arce
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Build a Foundation By Geo Hubela
2 Tips for Modern Teachers | Seeing the Good, Analyzing the Need By Bill Evans
2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Breaking It Down By Gregg Russell
A Better You | Ointment Options By Suzanne Martin, PT, DPT
Before aches appear, research which pain-relieving salve is right for you.
EditorSpeak By Lisa Okuhn and Karen White
FYI What’s Up In the dance community
On My Mind | Words from the Publisher By Rhee Gold

DEPARTMENTS
Classroom Connection By Michelle Knell
Ideas to incorporate into your curriculum
Mail Words from our readers
Mindful Marketing | Hootsuite’s Helping Hand By Lori Shecter
Teacher in the Spotlight | Whitney Teyf
Teachers who make a difference  
Thinking Out Loud | Beyond Normal Blue By Jennings Smith

FEATURES
Art for Art’s Sake By Neil Ellis Orts
Hope Stone Kids shouts out for diversity and individuality in art.
Ballet Scene | Personal and Provocative By Joseph Carman
TeenAge WasteLand gets teens talking, and dancing, about sensitive issues.
Boys to Men By Joseph Carman
Atlanta’s Men in Motion helps at-risk boys bypass crime for college.
Bright Biz Idea | You Want It? They’ve Got It! By Karen White
From the tried-and-true to the newest of the new, it was there at the DanceLife Teacher Conference.
Counterpoint and Connection By Ryan P. Casey
Choreographing dynamic duos is all about interaction.
Dancers With Voice By Maureen Janson
Wright State University emphasizes expression with acting and vocal training for dancers.
Dancing Inside By Arisa White
Teaching dance to the incarcerated.
Dancing on Common Ground By Ann Murphy
Dance Canvas turns to partnerships to nurture young choreographers.
Moving Passages By Jennifer Kaplan
Words and dance unite in a creative program for Baltimore students.
Onstage Poetry By Lois O’Brian
UB’s Digital Poetry and Dance Program links words and movement through technology.

 

 

Share

March-April 2014 Dance Studio Life

Share

Dance Studio Life, a magazine with a back-to-basics approach, is a division of the Rhee Gold Company, whose mission is to be at the forefront of dance and education by promoting the highest possible standards in teaching. Dance Studio Life understands the soul of the teaching field.

Dance Studio Life February 2014

 

 

COLUMNS
Ask Rhee Gold
Advice for dance teachers
2 Music Tips for Dance Teachers | Tempo Terms By Nina Pinzarrone
2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | Prepping for Partnering By David Arce
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Spin Savvy By Geo Hubela
2 Tips for Modern Teachers | Talk About Turnout By Bill Evans
2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Troubleshooting By Thelma Goldberg
College Close-Ups | Missouri State University
What students need to know about college and university dance programs.
EditorSpeak By Cheryl Ossola
FYI
What’s Up In the dance community

On My Mind | Words from the Publisher By Rhee Gold

DEPARTMENTS
Classroom Connection By M. Kyle Plunkett and Holly Derville-Teer
Ideas to incorporate into your curriculum
Mail Words from our readers
Mindful Marketing | Postcards With Punch By Rhee Gold
Teacher in the Spotlight | Mary Naftal
Teachers who make a difference  
Thinking Out Loud | A Tough Choice By Holly Derville-Teer

FEATURES 
Ballet Scene | Viva Villella By Joseph Carman
At the USA IBC, it’s curtain up on Act 3 of Edward Villella’s career.
Bright Biz Idea | A Brain for Business By Bonner Odell
In the world of studio ownership, being an artist isn’t enough. Here’s how to get the left-brain skills you need.
Concepts of Creation By Julie Holt Lucia
Modern-based composition classes fuel creativity and confidence.
Everybody Dance! By Claudia Bauer
National Dance Week Foundation gives a weeklong celebration a year-round presence.
From Earthworms to Elephants and Beyond By Elizabeth Zimmer
Using improvisation to help students grow as artists.
Infinite Possibilities By Lea Marshall
New Limon company-affiliated training program nurtures modern dancers.
Modern Dance, Step by Step By Ann Murphy
How to fine-tune a modern/contemporary curriculum for all ages.
Tap Festivals
A guide to 2014 tap festivals in the U.S. and abroad.

Share

October 2013 Dance Studio Life

Share

Dance Studio Life October 2013Dance Studio Life, a magazine with a back-to-basics approach, is a division of the Rhee Gold Company, whose mission is to be at the forefront of dance and education by promoting the highest possible standards in teaching. Dance Studio Life understands the soul of the teaching field.

COLUMNS
Ask Rhee Gold Advice for dance teachers
2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | Upper-Body Awareness By David Arce
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Building Endurance By Geo Hubela
2 Tips for Modern Teachers | Change and Replace By Bill Evans
2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Teaching Time Steps By Gregg Russell
A Better You | Sound Advice By Suzanne Martin, PT, DPT Maintaining a healthy teaching voice.
EditorSpeak By Cheryl Ossola and Karen White
FYI What’s Up In the dance community
On My Mind | Words from the Publisher By Rhee Gold

DEPARTMENTS
Classroom Connection By Holly Derville-Teer and Kerry Ring
Ideas to incorporate into your curriculum
Mail Words from our readers
Mindful Marketing | Social (Media) Savvy By Misty Lown
Teacher in the Spotlight | Thelma Goldberg
Teachers who make a difference  
Thinking Out Loud | Defining Reality By Julie Holt Lucia
Thinking Out Loud | Happy Ending By Amy Moy

FEATURES
Arizona Dance Invasion
Behind the scenes at the DanceLife Teacher Conference. 
Ballet Scene | For Children, By Children By Joseph Carman
Cuyahoga Valley Youth Ballet’s kid-friendly approach to ballet.
Bright Biz Idea | Perfect Pitch By Lisa Okuhn
The art of managing media relations.
Come Together By Misty Lown
Community groups add spice and surprise to dance recitals.
Costuming With Care By Megan Donahue
Common mistakes teachers make and how to avoid them.
From Private Passion to Public Good By Elizabeth Zimmer
How a recital crisis helped build a dance community.
From the Outside Looking In By Debbie Werbrouck
Parents and students chime in on the recital experience.
Higher-Ed Voice | Mamboing at MIT By Jennifer Kaplan
Mathematicians and scientists make smooth movers on the ballroom dance floor.
Seamless Show Strategies By Ryan P. Casey
Planning and running a tight show.
Showtime Shakeup By Julie Holt Lucia
Banish the recital blues by saying goodbye to the tried-and-true.
Showtime Styles By Maureen Janson
A look at who does what for recitals across the U.S.

.
   .

Share

September 2013 Dance Studio Life

Share

Dance Studio Life September 2013Dance Studio Life, a magazine with a back-to-basics approach, is a division of the Rhee Gold Company, whose mission is to be at the forefront of dance and education by promoting the highest possible standards in teaching. Dance Studio Life understands the soul of the teaching field.

 

COLUMNS
Ask Rhee Gold Advice for dance teachers
2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | Fine-Tuning Performances By David Arce
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Drop & Freeze By Geo Hubela
2 Tips for Modern Teachers | Unpacking, Uncovering By Bill Evans
2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Slides & Warm-Up By Gregg Russell
A Better You | Pampering During Pregnancy By Suzanne Martin, PT, DPT
How to make nine months of change easy on the body.
EditorSpeak By Lisa Okuhn and Karen White
FYI What’s Up In the dance community
On My Mind | Words from the Publisher By Rhee Gold

DEPARTMENTS
Classroom Connection By Karen White and Holly Derville-Teer
Ideas to incorporate into your curriculum
Mail Words from our readers
Mindful Marketing | Campus Connections By Maureen Janson
Teacher in the Spotlight | Chris Collins
Teachers who make a difference  
Thinking Out Loud | Weight Worries By Beverly Byrd

FEATURES
3 Studios, 1 Dance By Jennifer Kaplan
United Dance blends students from three schools at competitions.
Assemblee Internationale 2013 By Joseph Carman
Canada’s international festival proves there are no borders, nationally or technologically, in ballet.
A World of Dance By Josie G. Sadan
Dance Planet makes Dallas a hotspot each spring.
Ballet Scene | Fabulous Feet By Mme. Peff Modelski
How to give your students freedom and finesse.
Boston’s Irish Invasion | World Irish Dancing By Karen White
Championships make its second U.S. appearance.
Bright Biz Idea | Conquering Competition Costs By Lois O’Brian
Strategies that ease the burden.
Comp Directors Tell All
Their thoughts on talent, trends and tears.
Game Up! By Steve Sucato
An inside look at the studios that sweep competitions.
High Drama, Low Morale? By Debra Danese
How to avoid or fix dance-team troubles.
If C Is for Competition… By Karen White
E is for Etiquette.
Positive Dance Competitions
What teachers and parents do and say to help students get the most out of competing.
Schools with Staying Power | Infinite Possibilities By Rita Felciano
Gus Giordano’s revolutionary jazz dance technique lives on in his 60-year-old school.
Warm Up, Tune In, Let Loose By Megan Donahue
Strategies for prepping students physically, mentally, and emotionally.
Youth Dance Festival By Kay Waters
New Jersey competition nurtures young ballet students.
  .

Share

August 2013 Dance Studio Life

Share

Dance Studio Life August 2013Dance Studio Life, a magazine with a back-to-basics approach, is a division of the Rhee Gold Company, whose mission is to be at the forefront of dance and education by promoting the highest possible standards in teaching. Dance Studio Life understands the soul of the teaching field.

 

COLUMNS
Ask Rhee Gold Advice for dance teachers
2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | A+ Arabesques By David Arce
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Focus on Foundations By Geo Hubela
2 Tips for Modern Teachers | Placing the Weight By Bill Evans
2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Developing Musicality By Gregg Russell
A Better You | Sidestepping the Sidelines By Suzanne Martin, PT, DPT
Overuse injuries are a reality for any dance teacher. Here’s how to avoid them.
EditorSpeak By Karen White and Lisa Okuhn
FYI What’s Up In the dance community
On My Mind | Words from the Publisher By Rhee Gold

DEPARTMENTS
Classroom Connection By Kerry Ring and Karen White
Ideas to incorporate into your curriculum
Mail Words from our readers
Mindful Marketing | Beyond Open House By Megan Donahue
Teacher in the Spotlight | Dierdre Miles Burger
Teachers who make a difference  
Thinking Out Loud | The Love of My Life By Jackie L. Smith

FEATURES
Alexander Technique By Joseph Carman
Freedom of movement through consciousness.
Ballet Scene | Ballet’s Best, Cuban Style By Toba Singer
Encuentro Internacional de Academias de Ballet and Cuba’s influence on the international ballet world.
Ballet Teachers Unite! By Karen White
How an online chat room can create a community.
Beyond the Classroom By Julie Holt Lucia
Broaden your students’ dance education with a library corner, ticket exchanges, and more.
Bright Biz Idea | Dual Identity By Jennifer Kaplan
With a studio on each coast, Reflections in Dance serves as a business model of efficiency.
Business Owner’s Toolkit By Lisa Okuhn
Part 2: creativity at your fingertips.
Dance as a Bridge By Mary Grimes
Project: Generations unites young dancers with the elderly community.
Emotional Voice By Holly Derville-Teer
10 steps to more expressive dancers.
Get the ‘Glue’ By Misty Lown
Why every dance studio needs an office manager.
Higher-Ed Voice | Learning With the Heart By Bill Evans
Tending to the emotional side of students in teaching dance.
Money Talks By Debra Danese
School owners, faculty members, and independent contractors offer perspectives on teacher compensation.
MPACT on Families By Bonner Odell
Luna Dance Institute proves the power of parent-child dance.
Schools with Staying Power | Giacobbe Academy of Dance By Mary Ellen Hunt
Leading the way in dance education in Louisiana.
The Other Half By Rod Mohler
Survival tactics from a studio owner’s spouse.
World of Dance By Kat Richter
Teaching multiculturalism through creative movement.

  .

Share

May-June 2013 Dance Studio Life

Share

May'13_Cover_3x4Dance Studio Life, a magazine with a back-to-basics approach, is a division of the Rhee Gold Company, whose mission is to be at the forefront of dance and education by promoting the highest possible standards in teaching. Dance Studio Life understands the soul of the teaching field.

COLUMNS
Ask Rhee Gold Advice for dance teachers
2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | Weight and Balance By David Arce
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Dressing the Part By Geo Hubela
2 Tips for Modern Teachers | Spine Flexibility By Bill Evans
2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Adding and Enhancing Sounds By Gregg Russell
A Better You | Perk Up With Perfect Posture By Suzanne Martin, PT, DPT
EditorSpeak By Karen White and Lisa Okuhn
FYI What’s Up In the dance community
On My Mind | Words from the Publisher By Rhee Gold

DEPARTMENTS
Classroom Connection By Carol Crawford Smith and Kerry Ring
Ideas to incorporate into your curriculum
Mail Words from our readers
Mindful Marketing | Guerrilla Stategies By Julia Holt Lucia
Teacher in the Spotlight | Diane Moore Abraham and Susan Moore Edson
Teachers who make a difference  
Thinking Out Loud | Miracle Girl By Sara Brown

FEATURES
A Different Lens By Rita Felciano
Three dance professionals and their unique relationships with the world.
Aging Boomers, Dance Boom By Elizabeth Zimmer
Serving senior populations from coast to coast.
Ballet Scene | Passing It On By Joseph Carmen
As a teacher, former NYCB ballerina Kyra Nichols draws on Balanchine and more.
Bright Biz Idea | New Take on Networking By Lois O’Brian
How one school owner turned to the community for a business boost.
Dancing Toward Peace By Mary Ellen Hunt
Move This World’s international approach to empathy through movement
Decades of Dance By Holly Derville-Teer
3 later-in-life teachers offer a long view of teaching.
 Higher-Ed Voice | College Bound By Eliza Randolph
Educational consultant helps high schoolers and parents.
Project LIFT By Eileen Glynn
How New York Theatre Ballet helps children soar.
.

Share

July 2013 Dance Studio Life

Share

July'13_Cover_3x4Dance Studio Life, a magazine with a back-to-basics approach, is a division of the Rhee Gold Company, whose mission is to be at the forefront of dance and education by promoting the highest possible standards in teaching. Dance Studio Life understands the soul of the teaching field.

COLUMNS
Ask Rhee Gold Advice for dance teachers
2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | Barre Basics By David Arce
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Muscle Memory By Geo Hubela
2 Tips for Modern Teachers | Joy of Teaching By Bill Evans
2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Bombershays and Counter-Rhythms By Gregg Russell
A Better You | Sniffles & Sneezes By Suzanne Martin, PT, DPT
When to push them and when to stay home.
EditorSpeak By Karen White and Lisa Okuhn
FYI What’s Up In the dance community
On My Mind | Words from the Publisher By Rhee Gold

DEPARTMENTS
Classroom Connection By Misty Lown and Nina Koch
Ideas to incorporate into your curriculum
Mail Words from our readers
Mindful Marketing | Blogging Basics By Megan Donahue
Teacher in the Spotlight | Michelle Freiburger Nicholson
Teachers who make a difference  
Thinking Out Loud | Shut It Down? Think Again. By Lori Weil

FEATURES
Ballet Scene | Bringing in the Boys By Joseph Carman
From ballroom to hip-hop to ballet, Manatee School for the Arts knows how to draw young men.
Bright Biz Idea | No Money, Many Hands By Julie Holt Lucia
How volunteers helped a studio grow.
Business Owner’s Toolkit By Lisa Okuhn
Part 1: Practical solutions to everyday problems.
Collective Mentality By Julia Holt Lucia
Group-run schools take a different approach to running a business.
Nonprofit Nuts and Bolts By Karen White
What it takes to change your school’s financial status.
Nutcracker Variation By Mary Ellen Hunt
New England Ballet and special-needs kids put on a show to remember.
Tempting Twists on Tradition By Julia Holt Lucia, Larry Sousa, Holly Derville-Teer, Diane Gudat, Misty Lown
Five choreographers cook up a holiday show with must-use ingredients.
The Company Route By Holly Derville-Teer
3 teachers, 3 companies, 3 goals.
The Fine Art of Finding Money By Julie Kanter
Everything you need to know to get a grant.

.

Share

March-April 2013 Dance Studio Life

Share

Dance Studio Life March/April 2013Dance Studio Life, a magazine with a back-to-basics approach, is a division of the Rhee Gold Company, whose mission is to be at the forefront of dance and education by promoting the highest possible standards in teaching. Dance Studio Life understands the soul of the teaching field.

COLUMNS
Ask Rhee Gold Advice for dance teachers
2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | At the Barre By David Arce
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Slides By Geo Hubela
2 Tips for Modern Teachers | Discovering the Spine By Bill Evans
2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Turns and Flaps By Gregg Russell
A Better You | Shape Up for Summer By Suzanne Martin, PT, DPT
EditorSpeak By Karen White and Lisa Okuhn
FYI What’s Up In the dance community
On My Mind | Words from the Publisher By Rhee Gold

DEPARTMENTS
Classroom Connection  By Debbie Werbrouck and Debra Danese
Ideas to incorporate into your curriculum
Click! | A new look for the DanceLife Retreat Center website  
Online must-sees from the Rhee Gold Company
Mail Words from our readers
Mindful Marketing | Tempting Adults With Tap By Thelma Goldberg
Teacher in the Spotlight | Lisa Swenton-Eppard Teachers who make a difference  
Thinking Out Loud | Dancing Again, Ballroom Style  By Lois O’Brian

FEATURES
Ballet Scene | Ballet Meets Ethnic in Atlanta By Mary Ellen Hunt
Ballethnic’s uncommon blend of African and European dance.
Bright Biz Idea | Business No-Brainer By Julie Holt Lucia
Better at choreographing than accounting? Let a financial whiz handle the numbers.
Capturing the Truth By Joseph Carman
Rose Eichenbaum’s personal view of the icons of dance.
Dancing Big By Ryan P. Casey
Jimmy Locust’s kid-oriented mission matches his high -energy career.
Hooked on Horton By Eliza Randolph
Ana Marie Forsythe on Lester Horton’s legacy and the need for codified modern dance.
Inside the Dancer By Kerry Ring
Why you should learn what makes your students soar or stumble.
Making Space for Modern By Bonner Odell 
Why offer modern dance? Five reasons to get you motivated.

Tap Festivals
A guide to 2013 tap festivals in the U.S. and abroad
Tap Pups, Top Dogs By Kay Waters
Teaching older students new tricks.
You Say ‘Modern’… By Jennifer Kaplan
I say ‘contemporary.’ Rethinking the nature of ever-evolving dance.
.

Share

February 2013 Dance Studio Life

Share

Dance Studio Life, a magazine with a back-to-basics approach, is a division of the Rhee Gold Company, whose mission is to be at the forefront of dance and education by promoting the highest possible standards in teaching. Dance Studio Life understands the soul of the teaching field.

February 2013COLUMNS
Ask Rhee Gold Advice for dance teachers
2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | Rigor and Nuance By Mignon Furman
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | The Shoulder Bounce By Geo Hubela
2 Tips for Modern Teachers | Investigations By Bill Evans
2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Shuffles and Pullbacks By Gregg Russell
A Better You | Getting Out with Grace By Suzanne Martin, PT, DPT
EditorSpeak By Karen White and Lisa Okuhn
On My Mind | Words from the Publisher By Rhee Gold

DEPARTMENTS
Classroom Connection  By Kerry Ring and Lizanne McAdams-Graham
Ideas to incorporate into your curriculum
Click! | New DanceLife Teacher Conference website
Online must-sees from the Rhee Gold Company
FYI What’s up in the dance community
Mail Words from our readers
Mindful Marketing | Marketing Ideas for Summer By Teri Mangiaratti
Teacher in the Spotlight | Erin Spriggs Teachers who make a difference  
Thinking Out Loud | Hip-Hop Gold  By Carol Crawford Smith

FEATURES
Ballet Scene | Russia Calling By Joshua Bartlett
For authentic Vaganova training, head to St. Petersburg.
Bright Biz Idea | Rehearsals Made Simple  By Karen White
Online scheduler takes the pain out of private rehearsal planning and payment
Higher-Ed Voice | Dance Steps, Next Steps By Lisa Okuhn
A San Francisco school helps teens navigate the path to college dance programs.
Kicking Off Summer By Megan Donahue
In five short weeks, Kick Start gets kids jazzed for fall.
Stay-at-Home Summer Dance Intensive By Julie Holt Lucia
How to challenge and transform dancers right in your own backyard.
Summer Inspiration on a Shoestring By Julie Holt Lucia
Do-it-yourself staff development and continuing education.
Summertime Teacher Training 
Your guide to workshops and intensives across the U.S. and beyond.

Top of the Class By Jennifer Kaplan
Never mind the trophies and the technique-dance honor societies value effort and commitment

.

Share

January 2013 Dance Studio Life

Share

January 2013 CoverDance Studio Life, a magazine with a back-to-basics approach, is a division of the Rhee Gold Company, whose mission is to be at the forefront of dance and education by promoting the highest possible standards in teaching. Dance Studio Life understands the soul of the teaching field.

COLUMNS
Ask Rhee Gold Advice for dance teachers
2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | Pas de Cheval By Mignon Furman
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Muscle Control By Geo Hubela
2 Tips for Modern Teachers | Focus on Intent  By Bill Evans
2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Clean and Simple By Stacy Eastman
A Better You | Say What? Putting a halt to hearing loss. By Suzanne Martin, PT, DPT
EditorSpeak By Cheryl A. Ossola and Karen White
On My Mind | Words from the Publisher By Rhee Gold

DEPARTMENTS
Click! | Online must-sees from the Rhee Gold Company
Join Rhee Gold on Twitter
Classroom Connection By Michele Monaghan and Holly Derville-Teer
Ideas to incorporate into your curriculum
Strength in Numbers
Dance teacher organizations- where to team up, share ideas, and be heard
Thinking Out Loud | Feedback Frenzy By Holly Derville-Teer
Teacher in the Spotlight | Aradia of Las Vegas
Teachers who make a difference
Mail Words from our readers
Mindful Marketing | Selling a Message By Misty Lown

FEATURES
ADF Abroad By Jennifer Kaplan
Modern-dance ambassadors bring American methods and ideas to the world.

Ballet Scene | Moving With the Mouse By Joshua Bartlett
Angelina Ballerina finds a new home at North American dance schools.
Bright Biz Idea | Sister Studios By Misty Lown
Sharing a teacher, sharing success.
Flying Down to Rio By Jennifer Kaplan
Step aside, Fred and Ginger-Brazil opens its arms to student dancers.
Mind Games By Kerry Ring
Physical excellence takes mental preparation.
Of the People, for the People By Brian McCormick
At BYU, international dancing is a 50-year tradition
.
Russia’s Contemporary Culture By Meg Brooker
Exploration and self-expression take post-Cold War dance beyond ballet.
Two Halves, One Whole By Arisa White
Mexico and India meet onstage in a blend of dance and culture.
Work of the Heart By Joshua Bartlett
Preserving the traditions of Northwest Canada’s aboriginal dance.

.

 

 

 

Share

December 2012 Dance Studio Life

Share

Dance Studio Life, a magazine with a back-to-basics approach, is a division of the Rhee Gold Company, whose mission is to be at the forefront of dance and education by promoting the highest possible standards in teaching. Dance Studio Life understands the soul of the teaching field.

COLUMNS
Ask Rhee Gold
Advice for dance teachers
2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | Pointe Prep By Mignon Furman
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Music and the Mirror By Geo Hubela
2 Tips for Modern Teachers | The Whole Dancer By Bill Evans
2 Tips for Tap Teachers | 5-6-7-8 By Stacy Eastman
A Better You | Bodywork By Suzanne Martin, PT, DPT
The healing power of touch
EditorSpeak By Karen White and Cheryl A. Ossola
On My Mind | Words from the Publisher By Rhee Gold


DEPARTMENTS
Thinking Out Loud | New School, New Outlook By Chanel Lacasse
Teacher in the Spotlight | Sandra Balestracci Teachers who make a difference
Classroom Connection By Kerry Ring and Karin Wilde-Berry
Ideas to incorporate into your curriculum
Mindful Marketing | Tumblr Talk By Julie Holt Lucia
Click! | Online must-sees from the Rhee Gold Company
Mark Your Calendars for the 2013 Dance Life Teacher Conference.
Mail
Words from our readers

FEATURES
Ballet Scene | Bohemian Ballet By Mary Ellen Hunt
Ballet teacher Augusta Moore’s approach includes yoga and Feldenkrais principles.
Bright Biz Ideas | The Future Is Now By Misty Lown
Why offering employee benefits is a smart move in building your school’s stability and strength.
Giving ‘Em Love By Rita Felciano
San Francisco International Hip Hop Dancefest’s 14-year love affair with dance

Keeping It Fresh By Eliza Randolph
Husband-and-wife jazz dance teachers make “old school” relevant for young dancers.
The Heights of Hip-Hop By Karen White
At Phunk Phenomenon, hope and potential offer reasons to dance.
Higher Ed Voice |Jazzed by Jump Rhythm By Maureen Janson
Thanks to teacher Jeannie Hill, jazz dance at UW-Stevens Point has a Siegenfeld twist.
Introspective Leadership By MaryBeth Kemp
Improve your business by examining how you work.
Jazzed About Teaching By Kory Geller
A young dancer’s transition from learner to teacher and back again
Luigi By Joshua Bartlett
A dance legend and his game-changing style are still jazzing up dancers’ lives.
Strength in Numbers
Dance teacher organizations-where to team up, share ideas, and be heard

 

 

 

 

Share

Mignon Furman, Longtime DSL Writer and Well-Respected Ballet Teacher, Dies

Share

Mignon Furman with students; photo courtesy DSL

The Rhee Gold Company staff is in mourning today for Mignon Furman, a long-time Dance Studio Life writer and DanceLife Teacher Conference faculty member who died yesterday, December 4.

A funeral service was planned for this morning at 11am at the Carlebach Shul, 305 West 79th Street, New York City, followed by a burial at the Beth David cemetery in Elmont, New York.

Furman, founder and director of the American Academy of Ballet in New York, had written the popular “Two Tips for Ballet Teachers” column in DSL since July of 2007, and she was a good friend of Rhee Gold and many ballet teachers across the country.

Her ballet career started in South Africa where she danced with the University of Cape Town Ballet Company in ballets such as Les Sylphides, Swan Lake, Sleeping Beauty, Prince Igor, c, and other classics. She studied ballet in London, England, with Anna Northcote (Severskaya) and modern dance with Sigurd Leeder. On her return to Cape Town, she started her own ballet school with one student; it soon grew to be one of the largest ballet schools in South Africa, with a staff of 10 and more than 600 students. She founded both the Cape Town Ballet and the Port Elizabeth Youth Ballet.

She served as senior lecturer and acting director at the University of Cape Town Ballet School. Her excellence as an instructor and also a teacher trainer was recognized when she was nominated for the Distinguished Teacher Award out of the university’s entire academic faculty of 1,200 lecturers and professors.

Furman also founded and directed the University of Cape Town Youth Ballet, taught and choreographed in London, Tel Aviv, Paris, and Cannes, and served for four years as administrator of the Royal Academy of Dance USA in the early ’90s.

At her own American Academy of Ballet she ran a highly-respected summer intensive program for pre-professional dancers, and also created the Performance Awards, a program used by ballet programs around the world for recognizing students’ accomplishments.

Share

Hot off the Press! November DSL Online Now

Share

Waiting in a long holiday shopping line? Need a break from tree trimming? Check out the November issue of Dance Studio Life magazine now online and rejuvenate yourself with a hearty “Leap into Creativity.”

Along with helpful technique hints, marketing suggestions, and classroom strategies, this issue contains fun and fascinating features on topic such as: the Gelsey Kirkland Academy, classroom accompanists, Gaga movement, teaching expressiveness, and Boston Ballet’s Adaptive Dance. Interested in learning how to do professional-quality in-studio photography? Curious about the growing art of aerial dance? Or check out this odd couple: we found a dance studio that doubles as a furniture store.

And, as always, Rhee Gold dispenses a month’s worth of wisdom and advice in his popular “Ask Rhee Gold” column. Visit http://www.dancestudiolife.com/2012/11/november-2012-dance-studio-life/ to read all about it!

 

Share

November 2012 Dance Studio Life

Share

Dance Studio Life, a magazine with a back-to-basics approach, is a division of the Rhee Gold Company, whose mission is to be at the forefront of dance and education by promoting the highest possible standards in teaching. Dance Studio Life understands the soul of the teaching field.

COLUMNS                                                                                                                           Dance Studio Life, a magazine with a back-to-basics approach, is a division of the Rhee Gold Company, whose mission is to be at the forefront of dance and education by promoting the highest possible standards in teaching. Dance Studio Life understands the soul of the teaching field.

Ask Rhee Gold
Advice for dance teachers.
2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | Fouetté Fundamentals By Mignon Furman
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Artistic Vision By Geo Hubela
2 Tips for Modern Teachers | Strong and Liquid By Bill Evans
2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Early Steps in Improvising By Stacy Eastman
A Better You | Dealing With Doubt By Suzanne Martin, PT, DPT
Make a positive impression by nurturing a strong self-image.
EditorSpeak By Karen White and Lisa Okuhn
On My Mind | Rhee Gold
Words from the publisher.

DEPARTMENTS
Thinking Out Loud | Virtual Rehearsal

By Maureen Janson
Teacher in the Spotlight | Rachel Good

Teachers who make a difference
Classroom Connection By Debra Danese and Alice Korsick
Ideas to incorporate into your curriculum.
Mindful Marketing | A Birdie on Your Shoulder
B
y Julie Holt Lucia

FEATURES
Ballet Scene | Teaching Young Eagles to Soar By Joshua Bartlett
Classical training meets the art of storytelling at Gelsey Kirkland Academy.
Bright Biz Ideas By Eileen Glynn
Tea Dances and Coffee Tables
Studio Sidekicks By Ross LeClair
Classroom accompanists’ perspective on dance education.
Cultivating Creativity By Jennifer Kaplan
Three programs that nurture the next generation of choreographers.
Restored Glory By Karen White
Historic drops and drapes get a facelift from Curtains Without Borders.
Through the Lens of Gaga By Jennifer Kaplan
Modern movement language speaks to textures, instincts and sensations.
Intent and Expressiveness By Don Halquist
Teaching students to dance with the mind as well as the body.
The Joy of Movement By Mary Grimes
Boston Ballet gives students with Down syndrome the chance to dance.
Photo Fun By Pierre Lacasse
With some know-how and a good digital camera, school photo opportunities abound.
Daring Young Dancers By Rita Felciano
Taking movement to its heights with aerial dance.

 

 

Share

October 2012 Dance Studio Life

Share

Dance Studio Life, a magazine with a back-to-basics approach, is a division of the Rhee Gold Company, whose mission is to be at the forefront of dance and education by promoting the highest possible standards in teaching. Dance Studio Life understands the soul of the teaching field.

COLUMNS
Ask Rhee Gold
Advice for dance teachers

2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | Developing Trust By Mignon Furman
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Watch and Learn By Geo Hubela
2 Tips for Modern Teachers | Energy Paths By Bill Evans
2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Amping It Up By Stacy Eastman
A Better You | Wobble Your Way to Strength By Suzanne Martin, PT, DPT
Give feet and ankles a boost with balance boards.
EditorSpeak  by Cheryl A. Ossola and Karen White
Retrain Your Brain | Elephants Are Easier

On My Mind |Rhee Gold
Words from the publisher
  

DEPARTMENTS
Thinking Out Loud | Making Peace With Bodies By Lisa Okuhn
Few are born with a model’s body, and trying to attain one is the source of widespread anguish, especially among young women.  And for dancers, it’s worse.
Teacher in the Spotlight | Thelma Showman
Owner and teacher, Thelma Showman School of Dance, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma
Strength in Numbers | Dance Masters of Western New York, Chapter 8
Dance teacher organizations-where to team up, share ideas, and be heard.
Mindful Marketing | Getting Connected With LinkedIn
By Julia Holt Lucia
Classroom Connection
Making the most of class.
Bright Biz Ideas | Ticket to Sales Success
By Mary Grimes
Make short work of ticket sales with online services.

FEATURES
Shared Seclusion By Karen White
At the DanceLife Retreat Center, common ground, creativity,
and wisdom make for good times and lasting connections.

Lights Up! By Brian McCormick
From lighting to backdrops, professional-looking productions
keep audiences-and students-coming back for more.
No-Sweat Recital By Shannon O’Brien Marshall
Beat the heat and cruise through spring with a fall recital.
2-Way Street for Studio Owners By Misty Lown
A conference connection turns to mentorship, and more.
Beyond the Comfort Zone By Jennifer Kaplan
Spice up your studio’s offerings with guest teachers.
One-Stop Shopping By Karen White
Bundling fees means simplicity and convenience, all in one package.
Big Groups + Big Plans = Huge Impression By Gregg Russell
To make ensemble pieces sizzle, not fizzle, think like a director.
Shelter from the Burnout Storm By Holly Derville-Teer
Three school owners tell what to do when the deluge hits.
Moveable Dance By Eileen Glynn
In Atlanta, Dance Truck brings dance anywhere it wants to go.
Recital Rescues By Megan Donahue
How to go on when the going is tough.
Higher-Ed Voice | “I Can Do That!”  By Kerry Ring
How to help auditioning students shine.
Ballet Scene |Magaly’s Magic
Cuban-style training and warmth draw top dancers to Pompano Beach.
By Quinn B. Wharton

 

Share

DLTC Faculty Member Joins DSL Magazine as Monthly Contributor

Share

Gregg Russell; photo courtesy DLTC

Emmy-nominated choreographer and master tap teacher Gregg Russell will be sharing his insights into tap education each month as part of Dance Studio Life magazine’s “Two Tips for Tap Teachers” feature.

Russell, who will also be teaching at next summer’s DanceLife Teacher Conference, has joined the magazine’s esteemed “tipsters” Bill Evans (“Two Tips for Modern Teachers”), Mignon Furman (“Two Tips for Ballet Teachers), and Geo Hubela (“Two Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers”).

Russell has directed commercials and performed with numerous music artists. He appeared in a national Volkswagon commercial, trained Dancing With the Stars’ Derek Hough for an upcoming feature film, and performed on the Jerry Lewis Telethon and Dance Halloween charity events. As a master teacher he travels with Co. Dance Conventions and produces his own Tap Into the Network dance intensives.

His first set of tap tips will appear in the January DSL. For more information on the DanceLife Teacher Conference, visit http://www.dancestudiolife.com/dltc/dltc-fees-info/.

 

Share

Calling All Dance Teachers Organizations: Tell Your Story in Dance Studio Life

Share

Submissions are now being accepted for Dance Studio Life’s Strength in Numbers feature, which pays tribute to the numerous and active dance teacher organizations throughout the country and Canada.

Any organization that assists and supports dance teachers by providing opportunities for continuing education, networking, and social activities is invited to submit an article for publication in a 2013 issue of DSL. Articles can focus on any aspect of the organization, from its history to services to membership, and are important not only to spread the word of the group but also to recognize important individuals who have helped the organization stay strong and relevant.

Previous Strength in Numbers features have focused on the Colorado Dance Alliance, Dance Masters of Michigan, Dance Teacher’s Club of Boston, Florida Dance Masters, Cecchetti USA, Ohio Dance Masters, Rhode Island Dance Alliance, Associated Dance Teachers of New Jersey, and others.

Articles of between 400 and 700 words can be submitted to Karen@rheegold.com. Photographs of committee activities, such as workshops classes or PAC title competitions, are also welcome.

Share

Modern Dance Teacher Don Halquist Encourages Uniqueness in Students’ Performances

Share

Don Halquist; photo courtesy DLTC

In the November issue of Dance Studio Life magazine, SUNY Brockport professor Don Halquist shares his thoughts on teaching students how to layer their own passion, their own emotions, and their personal uniqueness on the choreography they have been taught in class or for performance.

Halquist, a member of the Bill Evans Dance Company for 20 years, will expand on these and other modern-dance concepts when he serves as a faculty member at next summer’s DanceLife Teacher Conference. Set for August 1 to 4, 2013, at The Phoenician in Scottsdale, Arizona, the DLTC features some of the top motivational minds in the dance education world.

Halquist has performed as a guest artist with the New Mexico Ballet and in the companies of Nora Reynolds Daniel, Licia Perea, Debra Knapp, and Jennifer Predock-Linnell; and has taught dance at the University of New Mexico, Santa Fe Community College, and the New Mexico Ballet Company school.

“We should encourage reflection on the part of our students,” Halquist says in his article. “Ask them to think about what the movement phrases mean to them, and encourage them to bring their own images to the material they are learning and performing.”

For more information on the DLTC faculty, visit http://www.dancestudiolife.com/dltc/dancelife-teacher-conference-faculty/.

Share

Personal Stories, Experiences, Advice, Needed for DSL Feature

Share

Dance Studio Life magazine wouldn’t be filled with all the insightful and inspirational stories it is without the generosity of teachers and studio owners from across the country who agree to share their stories with DSL and its readers.

This is particularly true of the monthly Thinking Out Loud (TOL) feature, written by studio teachers, owners, professional dancers, friends of dance, and even students. The stories—sometimes humorous, sometimes poignant—might feature the re-telling of an experience or hard lesson learned, reminisce about a mentor, speak about a challenge fought and overcome . . . or even air a gripe!

The editorial staff is always on the looking for new TOL columns, about 700 words spoken from the heart. Submitting is easy: just email the column with your contact information to Cheryl@rheegold.com. We hope to hear from you soon!

Share

So Many Ways to Keep in Close Contact with What’s Going on at the Gold Company

Share

Do you know about all the ways you can keep in touch with Rhee Gold and all that’s happening at the Rhee Gold Company?

By visiting www.dancestudiolife.com and clicking on Welcome, you can sign up to receive Ezines featuring articles from Dance Studio Life magazine with everything from classroom tips to business and inspirational features. You’ll also get the scoop on events and activities coming up at the DanceLife Retreat Center and DanceLife Teacher Conference.

To get the best in dance education articles at your fingertips, Dance Studio Life magazine is available through the Apple Newstand, accessible via the iTunes App Store. Dancers, dance teachers, and dance enthusiasts worldwide can now subscribe annually or download a single issue onto their iPhones and iPads (iOS 3.0 or later). The free app opens to a complete library of back, current, and future issues. Visit https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/dance-studio-life/id524932942?mt=8 to learn more.

Or subscribe to the daily DanceWire feed to read the latest news from the dance world, from what’s going on at professional companies to hot happenings at local studios across the country. Check it out at http://www.dancestudiolife.com/dsl-dance-wire/dsl-wire-rss-feed/.

 

Share

Competition and Conventions Coast-to-Coast Showcased in DSL December Issue

Share

Now that the hectic registration rush is done and kids are settled in their classes, many teachers turn their attention to competition season—and Dance Studio Life is here to help.

Our annual Competitions and Conventions listing is a comprehensive guide to what’s happening on the team scene, from friendly old favorites to cutting-edge newcomers. We’ve done the work of collecting contact information and descriptions of more than 150 competitions and conventions, and presented them in an easy-to-read format illustrated with energetic photos. Whether it’s a multi-day intensive workshop or a top-notch competition, you’ll find it here.

Look for the DSL Competitions and Conventions listing in our jam-packed December issue. To subscribe, visit www.dancestudiolife.com/subscribe/.

Share

Look for Jazz Legend Luigi in December issue of Dance Studio Life

Share

Luigi; Photo by Joseph Astor, courtesy Luigi’s Jazz Centre Facebook page

For half a decade, Luigi has been one of the reigning masters of jazz dance—holding court in his New York City classroom where jazz aficionados of all ages and abilities have benefitted from his in-depth knowledge and dedication to this very-American style of dance.

Dance Studio Life magazine pays tribute to this legend of dance in our December issue. If you love stylistic, savvy jazz dancing—and who doesn’t?—don’t miss this issue. To subscribe, visit www.dancestudiolife.com/subscribe/.

 

Share

Dance Masters Chapter 8 Thrilled with Dance Studio Life Article

Share

This week Rhee Gold received a personal letter from Marilyn Caccamise, secretary of Dance Masters of Western New York Chapter 8, expressing the excitement that she and her fellow club members felt after seeing their chapter featured in the October issue of Dance Studio Life.

Each month, DSL’s Strength in Numbers feature pays tribute to a dance teacher organization. Through pictures and illustrations, the feature explains why the group was founded and by whom, how it has grown over the years, and what sorts of services and education opportunities it affords members.

Some of the organizations featured recently include Michigan Dance Council, Colorado Dance Alliance, Canadian Dance Masters of America Chapter 38, Massachusetts Dance Educators Organization, and RI Dance Alliance. Any organization that would be like to be featured can contact associate editor Karen White at Karen@rheegold.com for more information.

Share

Artistry Online: Check out Dance Studio Life Magazine Covers

Share

Ten times a year, Dance Studio Life magazine presents pages and pages of insightful, emotional, and advice-packed articles about the dance studio world. But our readers tell us that what’s on the cover is always a treat as well—from twirling toddlers to dance icons.

Did you know you can peruse each and every cover from July of 2007 to now on www.dancelifetv.com and www.dancestudiolife.com? It’s fun to scroll down and check out the energetic images. Do you have a favorite? How about the snarling “wild animal” all dressed up and ready for recital, or the little Hawaiian dancer looking lovely in her lei? Geo Hubela coming at ya, or William Wingfield’s statuesque pose? What’s up for next month—we’re not telling, but we can almost guarantee it will make you go “Ah!”

Share

Vimeo Film Shows Famous Faces Sharing a Night at the Ballet

Share
Vimeo

A scene from “le ballet” on Vimeo; image by Louis Thomas, courtesy Vimeo

A recent film posted on Vimeo by Paris artist Louis Thomas that shows an audience filled with famous faces enjoying a night at the ballet credits Roland Petit, Jerome Robbins, and Marius Petipa for its precision “stick figure” choreography.

The four-minute animated video “le ballet” is set in an opulent hall similar to the Opéra de Paris Garnier and plays out along the sprightly strains of Rossini’s William Tell Overture. More than two dozen renderings of famous people—Bette Davis to Buster Keaton, John Ford to Elia Kazan, the Marx Brothers to Robert Mitchum, Gene Kelly to Julie Andrews—challenge viewers to flex their mental skills in a guessing game of who’s who. Scenes of the audience, backstage crew, and lobby staff are interspersed with moments from the ballet—which, since the dancers are faceless figures, offer short breaks from all that guessing.

In responding to comments, Thomas said the animation was all hand drawn on paper, then scanned and colored in Photoshop, with After Effects used for the compositing. A companion video shows some of Thomas’ early ideas and how they evolved into the finished film—created for his graduation year at GOBELINS, l’école de l’image; a school of applied arts, print, and digital media, in France.

On his blog, (http://louist.blogspot.com), Thomas admits to loving ballets, musicals, and operas. “When I see one, I always try to do some sketches about compositions, choreographies, and colors.” To see the video, visit http://vimeo.com/48547146.

Share

Oh, What a Feeling—Flashdance Heads to Broadway

Share
Flashdance

A publicity images from Flashdance, Photo courtesy Paramount Pictures/AP Photo

Dig out those leg warmers and headbands—Flashdance is coming to Broadway.

Producers said Tuesday that the stage adaptation of the 1983 hit movie about a working-class Pittsburgh girl with dreams of becoming a professional ballet dancer hopes to boogie into New York in August 2013.

A story in the Sacramento Bee said Sergio Trujillo, the choreographer of Jersey Boys, The Addams Family, and Memphis will direct and choreograph Flashdance—The Musical.

It features a book by Robert Cary and original screenplay co-writer Tom Hedley, music by Robbie Roth, and lyrics by Cary and Roth. Producers say it has been “substantially rewritten and completely restaged” following its short-lived debut in London in 2010. A separate company will begin a national tour in January 2013 in Pittsburgh.

To see the original story, visit http://www.sacbee.com/2012/09/04/4785598/flashdance-to-dance-on-broadway.html.

Share

September 2012 Dance Studio Life

Share

Dance Studio Life, a magazine with a back-to-basics approach, is a division of the Rhee Gold Company, whose mission is to be at the forefront of dance and education by promoting the highest possible standards in teaching. Dance Studio Life understands the soul of the teaching field.

Dance Studio Life cover September 2012
COLUMNS

Ask Rhee Gold
Advice for Dance Teachers

2 Tips for Ballet Teachers by Mignon Furman
2Tips for Hip Hop Teachers by Geo Hubela
2Tips for Modern Teachers by Bill Evans
2 Tips for Tap Teachers by Stacy Eastman
A Better You | Fighting Fatigue by Suzanne Martin, PT, DPT
How to cope when you’re toast
EditorSpeak by Cheryl Ossola and Karen White
On My Mind | Rhee Gold
Words from the publisher

DEPARTMENTS
Thinking Out Loud by April Spisak Nelson
The lost art of theater etiquette
Teacher in the Spotlight | Cosmin MarculetiuTeachers who make a difference
Schools With Staying Power | Alzine’s Vision by Roger Lee
Love, caring, and respect add up to 50 years at Cuppett Performing Arts Center
Bright Biz Idea
To Fee or Not to Fee
Mindful Marketing by Julia Holt Lucia
Create interest with Pinterest.
Classroom Connection by Jeanne Fornarola and Mary Beth Marino
Ideas to incorporate into your curriculum
Strength in Numbers
Dance teacher organizations

Dance Studio Life subscriptionFEATURES
Ballet Scene | Classical in Connecticut by Karen White
Ballet competition puts classics, and classes, front and center
A Dancer’s Mind by James Careless
Using psychology to improve physical performance.
No-Touch Zone by Kay Waters
How to cope when using a guiding hand in the classroom.
Making Magic With Music By Brenda Bufalino
In Tap and beyond, variety, volume, and interpretation make music meaningful.
An Excellent Option by Gina McGalliard
For dance convention seekers, an international event in L.A. might be just the ticket
Fast-Track to the Past by Maureen Jenson
Dance “webinars” give online listeners a weekly dose of dance history.
Handle With Care by Karen White
Put props to work for fun and impact

SPECIAL COMPETITION AND CONVENTION EDITION FEATURES
Competition Directors Tell All
What they think about solos, video streaming, scoring, and more
Give It a Gold by Julia Holt Lucia
Parents talk about the realities and rewards of the competition experience
From Ho-Hum to Knock ’Em Dead by Diane Gudat
How to turn good-enough dancers into performers with power
From Studio to Shining Sea by Karen White
Onboard with Celebrity Dance Competitions
Playing by the Rules by Eliza Randolph
Conflicts, no-shows, and too-frequent illnesses? Make commitment a competition team mandate.
 

Share

No-Touch Zone

Share
How to cope when using a guiding hand in the classroom can get you in trouble
By Kay Waters

No-Touch Zone Dance Studio LifeFor a certain generation of dance educators, feeling a teacher’s guiding hand on a leg, back, or even a rear end was often standard when they were students. That’s the way things used to be—a touch here, a tap there with a hand or stick were part of the usual learning experience for many dancers.

“My teacher not only manipulated us, but she’d whack us a little bit with her cane,” says Patricia Oplotnik, a teacher based in Oklahoma City. “We didn’t think anything of it. You just knew that if you did not stretch and lengthen the leg when she was walking by, she’d tap you with the cane to get you to stretch and lengthen.”

Oplotnik didn’t employ a cane in her classes when she started teaching dance 40 years ago and then, 10 years later, opened her own school, Applause Studios, in Oklahoma City. But she definitely used her hands to guide her students’ placement, positioning, and use of their bodies, just as her teacher had once done with her. That all changed when Oplotnik joined the faculty at Oklahoma City University’s Ann Lacy School of American Dance and Arts Management in 2000.

“We are not supposed to physically touch the students. That’s pretty much the standard in [higher] education now,” Oplotnik says. The veteran teacher admits that she still advises her college students that she was trained by a teacher who touches and that they should let her know if the issue is a problem for them. Occasionally, she tells them, she forgets and taps a knee if it’s not straight.

“The thought [behind teaching without touching] is that if you give the kids enough information to stimulate critical thinking, they will then have the ability to correct themselves,” she says. “You have to correct through symbolism, parables, show things on your own body. You have to get the point across the same way but without physically touching the kids.

“But it’s hard. Fortunately I’m an artist-in-residence for tap here, so it’s not as much of an issue for me,” Oplotnik says, alluding to the less hands-on nature of teaching tap dance. “But for a teacher ‘in the trenches,’ as I put it, who is teaching something like ballet technique, working on things like alignment and turnout, I think it’s a real challenge. And it’s a shame that this is even an issue.”

While the “no touching” rule has become standard in public education, more and more private studio teachers have also adopted the new mores over the years. Elizabeth M. McPherson, BA in dance education program coordinator at New Jersey’s Montclair State University, says that when she works with the students in the dance teacher-training programs, she warns them to be very careful.

“The thought is that if you give the kids enough information to stimulate critical thinking, they will then have the ability to correct themselves. You have to correct through symbolism, parables, show things on your own body. You have to get the point across the same way but without physically touching the kids.” —Patricia Oplotnik

“The first thing I say is to err on the side of caution. I tell them to remember that someone may interpret [a touch] differently from what you intend,” says McPherson. Montclair has a dance studio training program as well as one that offers certification to teach dance in public school systems.

McPherson points out that parents’ awareness of many dance-related issues—even topics like proper nutrition for dancers and the importance of stretching correctly, without being forced—has been heightened. But concerns about appropriate touching have been especially acute, she says. “There’s been a lot of media attention about sexual abuse cases. When there’s that much media attention, parents and students are on edge and high alert, which means you’ve got to be even more careful.”

The shift has even affected the big dance studios in major dance centers, where one might assume students are more aware of how teachers have traditionally used a more hands-on approach. This seems to especially be the case with male teachers.

Elizabeth Gibbons addresses the topic in her book Teaching Dance: The Spectrum of Styles. She says although everyone needs to be careful in this litigious age, it’s male teachers who have to employ extra caution.

“When I take class in New York City, I’ve noticed that a lot of the male teachers do not touch the students. Not at all,” says Gibbons, who teaches in the dance program at East Stroudsburg [Pennsylvania] University. “It’s kind of a shame, but I understand where they’re coming from. If you’ve ever heard of anyone who has been slapped with a lawsuit, then [you understand]; their feeling is ‘Hey, I’m not going to lose my ability to teach over this.’

 “It’s a shame that men are somewhat stigmatized, but it’s a reality,” Gibbons continues. “If I go to a playground and watch children play, it’s not a problem. But if my boyfriend watches children at a playground, some people may think, ‘Oh, he’s a pedophile.’ That’s just the way the world is. All teachers, but especially the males, have to think ahead and protect themselves.”

Some of the ways teachers can protect themselves are installing cameras or viewing windows in studios, including written policies about the use of touch in studio policy manuals, and being careful to limit physical contact with their students outside of the classroom.

Ramon Moreno, a principal dancer with Ballet San Jose who teaches at Western Ballet school in Mountain View, California, says that when he started teaching in the United States 16 years ago, he knew that he would have to do things differently with his students from what he’d experienced as a student training in his native Cuba. “You cannot do the things here that they do in Cuba,” he says. “It’s just not allowed. I figured out that it was different here because [teachers] talk about it, how it’s different.”

Moreno says he doesn’t take the special precautions some male teachers employ, such as leaving his studio door open. But he does allow parents to observe if they ask to, and he’s careful about how he touches his students while he’s teaching. “If I want to correct the arm, I’ll show on myself. Sometimes I will take a foot in my hand if it’s sickled because I want to develop the right shape of the foot. But that’s about all I’ll touch. Otherwise I just tell them,” he says.

“In Cuba if they want the arm fixed, they touch it. If they want the popo under, they touch the popo and tuck it under. If they want you to stretch the leg, they touch the leg,” he continues. “I had teacher who had a stick. He would give you a little hit on your popo or your leg to fix it. You can’t do that in this country.”

Moreno says a no-touching approach sometimes means student don’t grasp a correction as quickly as he’d like. “Sometimes it takes me longer; sometimes it doesn’t. Some kids get it right away,” he says. “It depends on the kid. It’s just a different way here. But I’m OK with that.”

Not everyone has changed the way they do things. April Spisak Nelson, director of Spisak Dance Academy in Glendale, Arizona, says she’s still teaching the same way she’s always taught—and the way her mother taught before her. “We’re lucky. It’s never been an issue here. We’re still pretty much hands-on. It’s hard to describe [concepts to kids] without touching them, especially when you’re talking about alignment and placement,” she says. And, she adds, her studio also teaches acrobatics, in which spotting a student by hand is essential for safety.

Nelson says she does use other methods when teaching, such as description and demonstrating on her own body—methods employed by teachers who do not touch. She also advises teachers coming in, especially male instructors, to exercise caution and do things like leave the classroom door open when they’re teaching so that anyone can see what they’re doing.

“Sometimes you just need to take that foot and put it in the correct position or correct that sickled foot,” Nelson says. “With younger kids especially, you have to touch them to get them to understand what you want. You can’t just explain and expect them to get it. They don’t have that awareness yet. They don’t have that coordination, that brain connection to the body parts you’re trying to work on.

“Sometimes I’ll show something on myself first and then have them try it. Some kids will get something that way,” she says. “Some kids will get the correction just by you giving it to them verbally. But with some kids, you have to touch them so that they understand.”

No-Touch Techniques

Learning to teach effectively without touching students is not optional; it’s a necessity, according to Jane Bonbright, executive director of National Dance Education Organization (NDEO).

The key in a lot of cases is for teachers to use their own bodies to demonstrate the desired correction or effect, she says.

“You can use your own hands to press in on the abdomen, or you can stand against a wall and show how you can’t get your hand all the way through [between the wall and the body] and if you can, then you’re hyperextending the pelvis. Then they can line up against the wall and press on their own abdomens with their own hands or press with their own pelvis and measure for themselves,” Bonbright says. “They can feel the shoulder blades against the wall. They can feel the lengthening. The responsibility is on them to take ownership intellectually of what you are communicating, and then physically, they take ownership.”

Many teachers interviewed advise studio owners to distribute a written policy on using touch to parents and also post it on the school website. Most agree that light touches to the extremities (hands and feet) are acceptable for corrections, although demonstrating on one’s own body is always best. However, corrections dealing with alignment and turnout can be particularly challenging.

Of course some methods will work better than others, depending on the age and body awareness of the students involved.

Here are some suggestions for communicating with students without touching them.

  • “When you’re talking about pointing your feet, you can talk about the imaginary line going down through the knee, through the shin, and into the third toe. They can experience it on their own by taking off their shoes. You articulate what they should be doing, and then you let them look at their own bodies and experience it through their own kinesthetic feedback.” —Jane Bonbright
  • “For a sway back, you can show them [the posture] exaggerated one way and how to bring it to neutral without necessarily having to touch them. You can place your hands on your body to demonstrate how to correct the body.” —Elizabeth McPherson
  • “There are teachers who, rather than grab or pull if they want the student to bring the arm higher, will put their hand above the student’s and tell the student to press into theirs. So the student is the one who is initiating the contact.” —Elizabeth Gibbons
Share

EditorSpeak

Share
Editor Speak Dance Studio LifeCultivating Empathy

The results are preliminary, but they’re a no-brainer to anyone involved in arts education. A study has found that “children that partake in music activity in a group setting are more prone to developing one of humankind’s noblest traits: empathy.”

The ramifications of this research are discussed in an article on San Francisco Classical Voice (sfcv.org) called “Is Music the New Social Media? ‘Empathy’ Entrainment.” The yearlong study at the University of Cambridge (UK) explored the effects of group music activities on 52 children ages 8 to 11, roughly half boys and half girls. They were divided into two groups, one of which was given group music-based games and the other activities that involved texts and drama only. The children in the music group scored higher on a test that measured empathy.

The experiments didn’t involve dance, but the correlation is obvious. The music activity stressed what lead researcher Tal-Chen Rabinowitch called “entrainment,” in which the children had to become “rhythmically attuned to one another” and “[i]mitation and the sharing of musical goals were also stressed.” Although the imitation games were largely improvisational, “[e]ach child playing a musical instrument had to attend to other children in the group.” Sounds like a dance class, doesn’t it? In effect, teachers are sowing the seeds of empathy.

If the study’s results prove significant and valid, the data will serve well those who argue for arts education. As Joe Landon, executive director of California Alliance for Arts Education, says in the article, “Quality arts programs have the potential to empower and engage students in ways that can promote learning across the board. Students who have a positive sense of themselves are more likely to embrace learning new things and find success in school.”

The article points out that the study raises the issue of individual versus group music education, since most music instruction “is geared toward private performance.” In dance, the opposite is true. So, dance teachers, take note: if group activities in which children are rhythmically attuned to one another promote empathy, your students will have it in spades.

Just one more reason why dance education matters. —Cheryl A. Ossola, Editor in Chief

Soft Touches

Did anyone catch that episode of Bunheads where Michelle discovered Fanny’s hatbox filing system? The one where her bills were deemed “should be paid” or “might be paid” and stored in oversized, decorative boxes? So funny—so true! I wished I had all your numbers so I could mass text, “Turn on your TVs right now!”

But the episode got better when Michelle (the amazing Sutton Foster) found out that Fanny (my hero, Kelly Bishop) had precious little money to pay even the “have to be paid” bills. But the studio is crawling with kids, Michelle says (or something along those lines), forcing Fanny to admit that all but nine of her 75 students are “on scholarship.” Michelle is stunned—“Only nine kids pay? Nine? Nine?” Fanny counters that times are tough, and someone’s father lost his job, and what is she going to do? She can’t deny these kids their ballet!

Still funny—but ouch! I was torn between feelings of delight that the show so cleverly exposed our secret little catch-22, and feelings of despair for the very same reason.

I can’t begin to recall how many conversations I’ve had with studio owners about parents who have cancer or mortgage woes. So sometimes the studio owners just “forget” about a bill or two. Sometimes they use their precious little time off to organize fund-raisers or quietly spread the word in the hope that other parents will cover some costs. They eat the costume charges, or dig deep to pay their staff when the tuition is overdue.

What else are they going to do when they’ve watched a child grow up, shared her smiles and her struggles, given their hearts away?

On the show, Michelle demands that everyone pay up and then has to beg for forgiveness when all the trees and flowers in Fanny’s “environmental ballet” quit. She’ll learn. It’s not that studio owners are bad businesspeople or sentimental pushovers or just plain dumb. It’s just that, like Fanny, they can’t deny these kids their dance. —Karen White, Associate Editor

Share

August 2012 Dance Studio Life

Share

Columns
Ask Rhee Gold
2 Tips for Ballet Teachers
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers
2 Tips for Modern Dance Teachers
2 Tips for Tap Teachers
A Better You | The Post-Dancing Diet
EditorSpeak
On My Mind

Departments
Mail
Thinking Out Loud | Making My Garden Bloom
Teacher in the Spotlight | Chris Grau
Bright Biz Idea | Doing Well by Doing Good
Mindful Marketing | Using QR Barcodes
Classroom Connection
Strength in Numbers

Feature Articles
Ballet Scene | Another Way to Soar by Steve Sucato
Teachers as Protectors by Roxanne Claire
Seen But Not Heard by Derrick Yanford
It’s an Imperfect World (and That’s Ok) by Kerry Ring
Higher-Ed Voice | West Coast’s One-and-Only by Lisa Okuhn
How Am I Doing? by Debbie Werbrouck
Talking Tap by Mike Wittmers
Dance Right In by Ryan P. Casey
Breaking Barriers, Building Bonds by Holly Derville-Teer
Spirit, Spunk, and Heart by Cheryl A. Ossola
Teachers in Training by Megan Donahue
Letting Loose by Diane Gudat
Strong to the Core by Joshua Bartlett

Share

Mail

Share

Words from our readers

Just a quick note to let you know how excited we were to see the article about the CNADM Centennial in the May/June issue [“A Century of Dance Education”]. Steve Sucato did a great job pulling it all together from many different sources. We very much appreciate the coverage and all the support that we receive from DSL every year.
Kathy Velasco
Chicago National Association of Dance Masters
Rockford, IL

I love Dance Studio Life and really believe in what you are doing with your publication. Thank you for being such a positive and “real” resource for the dance community.
Caron Moore
Director, Encore Performing Arts Showcase, Inc.
Fort Worth, TX

Dance Studio Life seems to be the only dance-related magazine I have read that always takes care of the little guy. I was thrilled to read the article about Mary Alpha Johnson [“Reviving Mom’s Dream,” May/June 2012]. Over 20 years ago I met a teacher at a dance conference who let me in on The Magical Kingdom of Dance. The book is a wonderful way to use imagery that is child appropriate but still gives the exact quality to bring the movement out of the student. I hope the mat will be a big success and that her daughter can find an effective way to market the products.
Shelly Holmes
Topeka, KS

I am so impressed and excited by the incredible article [“Ballet Without Barres,” July 2012]! You covered so much in a factual and eloquent way. I couldn’t have dreamed of a more perfect representation of BalletBarreNone—and right before the Dance Teacher Summit! I am so grateful to you for this phenomenal exposure.
Eileen Juric
Founder, BalletBarreNone
North Carolina

Share

July 2012 Dance Studio Life

Share

Columns
Ask Rhee Gold
2 Tips for Ballet Teachers
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers
2 Tips for Modern Dance Teachers
2 Tips for Tap Teachers
A Better You | Headache Help
EditorSpeak
On My Mind

Departments
Mail
Thinking Out Loud | Unexpected Inspiration
Teacher in the Spotlight | Jennifer Sue Peterson
Bright Biz Ideas | Sweat and Sizzle
Mindful Marketing | Coupons for Bargain Hunters
Classroom Connection
Strength in Numbers

Feature Articles
Ballet Scene | Ballet Without Barres by Karen White
Bullying Launches a Business by Karen White
What They Do for Love by Elizabeth Zimmer
My Boss, My Buddy by Joshua Bartlett
Not Just Child’s Play by Mary Grimes
Short and Sweet by Eliza Randolph
A Nutcracker With Legs by Jennifer Kaplan
Movies With a Twist by Diane Gudat


 

Share

EditorSpeak

Share

Don’t Fly—Walk
The 2012 graduates of the University of Pennsylvania got some unusual commencement advice. Nipun Mehta, the founder of ServiceSpace.org, told the Ivy Leaguers that though everyone else might expect them to fly, he wants them to walk. What he said makes sense for all of us, and it seems particularly timely advice for our business-focused issue.

Mehta and his wife spent three months walking across India, and his speech contained many personal anecdotes. (For the whole transcript, see huffingtonpost.com and other sites.) What I’d like to share with you, in edited form, are his words on four behaviors he pegs to the acronym WALK.

Witness: “When you walk, you quite literally see more. . . . Higher speeds smudge our peripheral vision, whereas walking actually broadens your canvas and dramatically shifts the objects of your attention. . . . A walking pace is the speed of community.”

Accept: “When walking in this way, you place yourself in the palm of the universe, and face its realities head on. We walked at the peak of summer, in merciless temperatures hovering above 120 degrees. . . . [W]e had to cultivate the capacity to accept the gifts hidden in even the most challenging of moments.”

Love: “Most of us believe that to give, we first need to have something to give. . . . We have forgotten how to value things without a price tag. Hence, when we get to our most abundant gifts—like attention, insight, compassion—we confuse their worth because they’re, well, priceless.”

Know Thyself: “[W]hen we serve others unconditionally, we shift from the me-to-the-we and connect more deeply with the other. That matrix of inter-connections allows for a profound quality of mental quietude. . . . [W]e are then able to see clearly into who we are and how we can live in deep harmony with the environment around us. . . .”

A three-month pilgrimage isn’t possible for all of us, and it might not yield the same epiphanies Mehta’s did. But I’m just fine with stealing his. —Cheryl A. Ossola, Editor in Chief

 Where There’s a ‘Why,’ There’s a Way
The actor was not getting it. In a middle school production of Fame I was choreographing, his character, playing a performing-arts high school student cast as Mercutio, had the line “They have made worms’ meat of me!” The script told him to grab his gut in an “overly theatrical” manner, which our show’s director was more than happy to demonstrate. But still, the actor’s performance was bland.

Running into the actor in the wings, I blurted out, “What’s worms’ meat?” Met with a blank stare, I explained that, in Shakespeare, “worms’ meat” means the person is dead. Why? Because worms wiggle their way through cracks in wooden coffins and proceed to suck the eyeballs out of dead corpses and make a feast of every bit of rotten flesh. (I was talking to a middle school boy, remember.) For the first time in rehearsals, I had not only his full attention but that of about a dozen performers who listened in, slack-jawed.

The next time he delivered the line, he grabbed his gut as if Ridley Scott’s alien was about to burst forth. The director leaped from her seat. “Bravo, Jacob!”

I call what I did the magic “why.” As teachers, we tell kids what to do, show them what we mean, and ask them to try. It doesn’t matter if you are teaching math, English, dance, or soccer—the method is the same. But in the rush to jam in as much as we can on a deadline—and a director blocking a play is in the same boat as a dance teacher preparing for recital—the “why” often gets short shrift.

I think real learning takes place when students understand the reasons for what we’re asking them to do. Explaining them takes time, for sure, because there isn’t always a simple answer, and many times the answer itself begets many more “whys.” And the discussion might lead us teachers to admit we aren’t exactly sure “why” ourselves. The best result, of course, is when we ask the question and the kids fill in the blank.

So keep a few “whys” in your back pocket to throw around the next time the kids are bored, or struggling, or flippant. Why? Because I said so. —Karen White, Associate Editor

Share

DANCE STUDIO LIFE GOES GLOBAL WITH FREE ISSUE

Share

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: Rhee Gold Company 508.285.6650
rheegold@aol.com

DANCE STUDIO LIFE GOES GLOBAL WITH FREE ISSUE

NORTON, MA, May 20, 2012

Dance Studio Life magazine has hit the global market with the launch of online editions made available through the Apple Newsstand, accessible via the iTunes App Store. Dancers, dance teachers, and dance enthusiasts worldwide can now subscribe to the magazine annually or download single issues onto their iPhones and iPads (iOS 3.0 or later); options will soon be available for other smartphone devices. The free app opens to a complete library of back, current, and future issues.

To celebrate the launch, Dance Studio Life is offering a complimentary download of the May/June 2012 issue to the first 5,000 users.

“This is an exciting time for the magazine,” says Dance Studio Life publisher Rhee Gold. “The new online editions are a plus for both readers and advertisers. Our inspiring stories on all things dance now have no geographical boundaries. Users will find interactive features throughout the magazine, from clickable links that bring them to our advertisers’ websites to embedded videos that play with the touch of a finger.”

With more than 66,000 readers, the print edition continues to flourish. The new app’s interactive features are just a small sample of Gold’s vision to maintain Dance Studio Life as the leader in the magazine industry. With this digital opportunity, Dance Studio Life will spread its inspirational and educational content to tens of thousands of dance lovers and educators around the world.

To get the free app and download your free May/June 2012 issue, visit the App Store > Newsstand and search for Dance Studio Life.

 

Share

May-June 2012 Dance Studio Life

Share

Columns
Ask Rhee Gold 
2 Tips for Ballet Teachers 
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers 
2 Tips for Modern Dance Teachers 
2 Tips for Tap Teachers 
A Better You | Health Care How-Tos 
EditorSpeak 

On My Mind

Departments
Mail 
Thinking Out Loud | Why I Walked 
Teacher in the Spotlight | Katie Petronio 
Bright Biz Ideas | Reviving Mom’s Dream 
Mindful Marketing | 10 Tips for Great Newsletters 
Classroom Connection 
Strength in Numbers 

Feature Articles
Ballet Scene | The Chautauqua School of Dance by Steve Sucato  
Searching for Acceptance by Joshua Bartlett  
A Century of Dance  
Higher Ed Voice | A Fresh Approach by Joshua Bartlett  
Fire in the Dark, Beauty for the Spirit by Ann Murphy  
The Power of Hero Worship by Diane Gudat  
Every Day, a Little Miracle by Jennifer Kaplan 


Share

EditorSpeak

Share

Pina’s Power
The 3-D documentary Pina has had the U.S. dance world talking since it opened here last December, and the film came up during a pre-show Meet the Artist interview I did with San Francisco Ballet principal dancer Damian Smith last March. A longtime dancer who’s known for his artistry in both physicality and interpretation, Smith cited the film as reaffirming that what’s most important in dance is intent.

I couldn’t agree more. I’ve seen the late German choreographer Pina Bausch’s company, Tanztheater Wuppertal Pina Bausch, in performance, and the experiences left me stunned. But the film, with its concentrated scrutiny of dances, revisiting them in various forms and with different dancers, revealed even more pointedly the phenomenal power of intent.

Bausch’s work is oblique, coming from a deep place of pain and loneliness (“Dance, dance,” she once said, “otherwise all is lost”), embodying desperation, desire, and other equally raw emotions, along with a quirky sense of humor. But unlike some dances that leave viewers wondering what they just saw, Bausch’s works offer a dizzying choice of interpretations. That’s because her dancers know exactly what the dances mean to them. They are invested—body, mind, and soul—in the movement given to them, and because they so clearly have something to say, they in turn give us a work of art that we bring our own meaning to.

Some of the dancers quoted in the film said they were often confused about what Bausch wanted from them. One of them said that when she told Bausch she felt lost, the choreographer said to keep looking inside herself. The dancer said she didn’t know what she was looking for, and Bausch said only this: keep searching.

What that dancer found is what we all want in dance—an experience that shakes us to the core, makes us question what we think of the world, and gives us reasons to keep searching for our own reasons to go on. —Cheryl A. Ossola, Editor in Chief

Tears and Togetherness
It was only the first competition of the new season and boy, were the tears flowing already! I started to think: where are the TV crews when you need ’em? Drama, tears, girls in costumes making a scene—we had it all, and we weren’t even halfway through the first day.

One girl started it all. A senior. Apparently just moments before the girls headed onstage for their lyrical number, she realized this was one of her last competitions with teammates she loves from a dance studio she adores. One tear and a tiny sniffle led to “Ooohhhh, are you crying?” and before anyone realized what was going down, all the girls were in each other’s arms, fussing over each other and sobbing with gusto.

They were almost back in control when someone’s 6-year-old sister showed up and, without a word, held out a tiny package of tissues.

And as they dissolved again in laughter and splotchy mascara, I thought—this is what all dance teams should be about. Friendship. Support. Doing what you love with people who share the same passion. Pressure, but the kind born of hard work and self-determination. Memories.

During awards, the MC called up several members of this group. In an interesting twist, the competition had asked this team to create a special award to be given by the judges to another team. They chose the name “Together at Heart” and described it thus: “To a team that not only dances together with precision, but dances together as friends.” I am sure that the dancers who won the award will cherish it.

There were other special moments as well: a couple of high scores, a choreography award, and a judge’s recognition of one girl who, although only in group numbers, stood out because of her endless smile and vivacious energy. Her teammates were tickled pink. “Hey Dee,” they couldn’t stop teasing, “guess that puts you at the top of the pyramid!”

All that, and three more competitions to go. Now where’s that little girl with the tissues? —Karen White, Associate Editor

Share

March-April 2012 Dance Studio Life

Share

Columns 
Ask Rhee Gold  
2 Tips for Ballet Teachers 
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers 
2 Tips for Modern Dance Teachers  
2 Tips for Tap Teachers 
A Better You | Say Goodbye to Smoking 
EditorSpeak 

On My Mind  

Departments
Mail  
Thinking Out Loud | I Remember Tony  
Teacher in the Spotlight | Donna Abnathy  
Bright Biz Ideas | Betrayed by a ‘Friend’  
Mindful Marketing | Musical Theater and More  
Classroom Connection 
Strength in Numbers 

Feature Articles
Ballet Scene | Floor Barre by Karen White  
Practicing to Be a Pro by Joshua Bartlett  
Simon Says: Listen Up! by Mike Wittmers  
20 Going on 40 by Kay Waters  
Rescued by Dance by Misty Lown  
A Touch of Broadway by Jennifer Kaplan  
Back From the Brink by Steve Sucato  

 

Share

EditorSpeak

Share

Coping With “Copy-ography”
It made No. 4 on TenduTV’s blog listing “APAP Preview: Ten Things the Dance Field Should Be Talking About in 2012,” and I’m sure it has been popping up in your conversations more and more. What is it? The issue of intellectual property rights, otherwise known to dance teachers as “Hey, that’s my choreography!”

This is a slippery subject, but one that is probably causing plenty of heartache and heartburn this competition season. It would seem that if an idea came out of your head, you would own that idea, but life today is rarely that simple. The professional world with all its contracts and lawyers still can’t figure out if Beyoncé really “stole” those steps from Belgian choreographer Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker when putting together her “Countdown” video.

It’s even worse for those of us in the dance studio trenches, where video cameras outnumber contracts 1,000 to 1. What prevents a teacher from using steps she picked up at a convention in her own dances and calling them her own? What stops Studio C from re-creating Studio D’s award-winning competition number from last season? Or, with more and more competitions streaming live, even stealing from this season?

Years ago I read a magazine article about a studio that did a number to “It’s Oh So Quiet” with the dancers as librarians. Eureka! Not even having seen it, I immediately imagined what it would look like: the funny moments, the choreography, how we’d use books and chairs and tables to build this crazy number. As tempted as I was (and believe me, you know those days when you’d kill for just one good brainstorm), I never did it, because, well, it was someone else’s idea.

Some people see nothing wrong with lifting ideas, songs, concept, even entire choreography sequences, from work they catch on YouTube, in competition, in recitals. One of my studio-owner friends calls it “copy-ography.” We chatted about it one night after lessons, and while in some industries a similar discussion might involve copyrights or compensation, we just decided the whole situation is very sad. I think I’ll stick to my own ideas, thank you, good or bad. —Karen White, Associate Editor

It’s a Team Effort
The musical The Wild Bride, performed by Cornwall, England–based Kneehigh Theatre Company at Berkeley Repertory Theatre, is a prime example of a collaborative process that works. The production is stunning, with a rustic set, emotionally driven dance numbers, and music that’s a blend of blues and Eastern European folk—nothing I’ve ever heard before.

Because I am interested in adapting literary works for the stage, without simply reiterating the text theatrically, I was intrigued by how in this production (adapted from the Brothers Grimm fairy tale “The Handless Maiden”), word, set, movement, and score came together in a way that made a 150-plus-years-old story seem fresh, complex, and relevant.

In the program notes, Emma Rice, the show’s director and co-director of Kneehigh, reveals the troupe’s creative process. She works on sketches with the designer to create an environment for the story to live in and exchanges music that feels right to her with the musical director/composer, who then comes up with a “musical palette of melodies.” Amazingly, no script is created with the writer; instead poems, lyrics, and ideas are produced and a structure is mapped out in order to maintain an element of surprise. “The shared imagination is greater than any individual, so we begin the rehearsal by returning to the story,” Rice says. “We tell it to each other, scribble thoughts on huge pieces of paper, relate it to our own experience. We create characters, always looking to serve and subvert the story.”

So that is how a collaborative process that engages all the players fosters original, creative art. Regardless of the story that compels us to the stage, unique work often is not created alone. Sometimes you need others, and even your students, to help you scratch that itch. —Arisa White, Editorial Assistant

Share

Mail

Share

Words from our readers

I cried when I saw the news that modern dance legend Ruth Currier had passed [“FYI,” December 2011]. I first encountered Ruth at the Limón school; she became the director shortly after José Limón died. Ruth made up for missing the opportunity to study under José in so many ways. She was always true to the Limón, Humphrey, and Weidman techniques and inspired us with her stories of José. She was truly my mentor. When she left the Limón company and opened her own studio, I relinquished my scholarship to follow her.

Taking a class with Ruth was ever so challenging physically, mentally, and emotionally. She pushed us to go beyond our comfort zone; she loved it when we fell off balance because she knew we were trying to do the movement more fully.

I remember telling her I wished I had been alive when Doris Humphrey and Charles Weidman had their companies since their movement felt so natural to me. I actually felt I had learned them before, as if I had been dancing in that time. She commented that I probably had and that I would have fit in nicely in that era. That conversation has given me inspiration ever since. Ruth was sparse with her compliments in class and I cherish every one that came my way. Ruth may be gone, but I will pass on her knowledge to my students so that her memory lives on.
Joanna Furman-Markowitz, Director
Orange County School of Dance
Little Feet Dance Company
Monroe, NY


Just wanted to thank you wholeheartedly for the beautiful article about our Dance Academy and the “Road Trip to the Future” [December 2011]. The students were electrified when they saw their photographs and names in the article. Your dedication to our dance community is second to none—keep up the fine work.
Diane Swirka
PR Manager, Kinetic Expressions Dance Academy
Daytona Beach, FL

Share

February 2012 Dance Studio Life

Share

Columns
Ask Rhee Gold
2 Tips for Ballet Teachers
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers
2 Tips for Modern Dance Teachers
2 Tips for Tap Teachers
A Better You | Beating the Blahs
EditorSpeak
On My Mind

Departments
Mail
Thinking Out Loud | Down But Not Out
Teacher in the Spotlight | Suzanne Welch-Kakouris
Bright Biz Ideas | Bring On the Bachelorettes
Mindful Marketing | Summer Camp Srategies
Classroom Connection
Strength in Numbers

Feature Articles
Ballet Scene | Personality Cults by Stephen Manes
Summertime Teacher Training
Higher-Ed Voice | Dance Geets a Boost in Missouri by Marlise A. Cole
A Walk on the ‘Wildish’ Side by Joshua Bartlett
Back to School at ABT by Roxanne Claire
Dream Weaving by Sandi Duncan
Me Time: Meditation by Dunya Dianne McPherson

Share

EditorSpeak

Share

Tune-Up Time
For many of our readers, summer is a time to slow down, maybe even take some time off. And so it seemed like perfect timing to suggest using the slower months of summer to look inward and do some personal maintenance. We all take our cars to the mechanic and our kids to their checkups, but how often do we focus on our own well-being? In this issue, we’ve got some ideas on how to do just that, through a creative process of goal setting, a primer on meditation, some apps to help you with on-the-go wellness, and a few fun tips on teas and inspirational jewelry. It’s a package designed with you in mind, the brainstorm of my editorial assistant, Arisa White.

And now I’m going to take the idea of introspection a step further and say that it could (and perhaps should) include some awareness-raising about our attitudes toward others. So I’m going to steal some suggestions worth noting from an online holiday card posted last December by SYPartners.com, a company that promotes transformation in organizations. (Some of the wording is theirs; some I’ve paraphrased.)

First, exercise relentless empathy. How? Set aside your own worldview and see someone else’s. Dignify others by acknowledging their value.

Second, be that person. Which one? The one who’s fully present, calls everyone by name, and starts sentences with “What if?”

Third, curmudgeons be damned. There’s good in everyone, so find it. Expect the best in people and that’s usually (eventually) what you’ll get.

Fourth, embrace not knowing. In a fast-changing world, it’s the best way to open yourself to great things.

It’s not too late to add these behaviors to your list of resolutions for 2012. I’m sure going to try—are you game? —Cheryl A. Ossola, Editor in Chief


Sondheim’s Songs
I’m engrossed in a new book, and it’s a real page turner. I know whodunit, so there’s no mystery. In fact, I’m pretty familiar with the protagonist and his life story. But still, I’m savoring each word and can’t wait to see what the next paragraph brings.

It’s Finishing the Hat: Collected Lyrics (1954–1981) with Attendant Comments, Principles, Heresies, Grudges, Whines and Anecdotes by Stephen Sondheim. I wasn’t too thrilled to pick it up initially—I have a shelf full of musical-theater books, from rants to gossip to dissertations on the worst flops ever, and a list of lyrics sounded like a yawn. Did I say I knew Sondheim? I should have known better.

Because not only does he list all his lyrics, including changed verses and discarded tunes, but he dissects his own work with the skill of a surgeon (or a show doctor, as it were). It’s fascinating to follow him along as he looks back on his earliest efforts, and with the wisdom gained through years of doing a job only a few people have actually done well, tells us exactly where he went wrong.

From miscalculations to compromises to plain crappy work, he explains the art of lyric writing. Consider this comment from a song cut from West Side Story: “Wrong: the heavy use of soft consonants like s and n, which make the Jets sound more like a hissing radiator than a gang on the warpath.” Or, despite Maria’s uneducated immigrant status, how he couldn’t resist showing off with “It’s alarming how charming I feel.”

Of course, as he moves along to Gypsy, Company, A Little Night Music, and beyond—in this book as well as the sequel, Look, I Made a Hat: Collected Lyrics (1981-2011)—the comments become more about why things work than why they don’t.

So since I’m a choreographer, not a lyricist, what does his book teach me? That all artists (even geniuses) have to take time to hone their craft; that no work (even on songs thrown away) is wasted; and that everyone can benefit from a little self-reflection now and again. Some nice advice from a man with no vice . . .  or is it price? Mice? (Sigh.) —Karen White, Associate Editor

Share

Mail

Share

Words from our readers

So inspired to see so much work go into such a worthy cause [“A Shoe Show With Heart,” October 2011]! The ripple effect is always there; we just need more people to throw the first stone. Congratulations on a wonderful show and community service.
Michelle Ballaro
Ballet Arts Center for Dance
Cheektowaga, NY
via Facebook


I enjoyed reading the article [“Dads on Demand,” October 2011]. This story is all about the kind of dancer dad I want to be.
E. Keith Turner
via Facebook


We all love the article [“Ballet Scene: Ballerinas of a Certain Age,” November 2011]! You were able to capture the essence of our school and the “ladies of a certain age” quite well. Mimi is already planning her next ballet spoof of Coppélia for November.
Jayne Santoro
Dance School/Performing Arts Director 
JCC of Mid-Westchester 
Scarsdale, NY


I just finished reading “Thinking Out Loud: [Creating a Culture of Welcome]” in the November [2011] issue. My, how the opening statement hit home. I travel to Florida quite often and always thought I’d like to take a class there. I called to ask if a recreational dancer would be welcome and was told it was definitely a class for adults who wanted to stretch and tone. [Once there] I overheard a student saying that just because it says “adult” doesn’t mean just anyone can drop in. You can bet I won’t be returning to class there again.
April Mosher
Agawam, MA

Share

January 2012 Dance Studio Life

Share

Columns
Ask Rhee Gold
2 Tips for Ballet Teachers
2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers
2 Tips for Modern Teachers
2 Tips for Tap Teachers
A Better You | Mood Swings, Menopause, and Men
EditorSpeak
On My Mind

Departments
Mail
Thinking Out Loud | Dancing for Bill (Shakespeare That Is)
Teacher in the Spotlight | Cricket Mannheimer
Bright Biz Ideas | Seal of Approval
Mindful Marketing | High Returns on Referrals
Classroom Connection
Strength in Numbers

Feature Articles
Dancing in Dhaka by Claire Sheridan
Ballet Scene | Strict From the Start by Jennifer Rienert
Ancient Dance in a Modern World by Kalpana Mohan
Live Music: Worth the Price? by Kay Waters
Mexico in Their Blood by Eliza Randolph
Capturing the Elusive: Dance Preservation by Meg Brooker
Poor Kids, Rich Prosepects by Jennifer Kaplan
Bollywood’s Best by Gina McGalliard

Share

EditorSpeak

Share

Art for a New Year
It’s a new year, always a good time to think about where we’ve been and where we’re going. As dancers and dance teachers, you’ve probably got creativity on your mind—and that leads to a question you might not ask yourself very often: why make art? And where does it happen—only on a stage, or in a classroom? Or does art really gain shape and meaning in places that are more metaphysical than physical, in our hearts and minds?

In one of this issue’s stories, “Poor Kids, Rich Prospects” (page 88), teacher Melanie Rios Glaser believes that the children and teens who study dance at The Wooden Floor are doing more than learning and performing dances. According to her, they’re making art. And that fact just might be what makes that program for low-income children the success it is. Art, perhaps more than anything else, has the power to transform.

Contemporary artist Richard Serra, known for his steel sculptures, talks about why he makes art in a video posted on YouTube by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, which is hosting a retrospective exhibit of Serra’s drawings through January 16. He’s speaking of fine art, but his words hold true for the performing arts as well.

“I think one of the things art does [is] it asks you to perceive what it is on its own level. And it can come up and grab you at any time. It can be reassuring or it could be exactly the opposite—it could agitate you; it could be something you dismiss; it could be something that engages you; it could be something you recall; it could be something that leads to things that have nothing to do with what you’re looking at. So I think works of art engage, possibly, an internal memory bank that isn’t linear. And it can make you see the outside reality in that way also, like you probably see the world in ways that you would not have seen it if those artists had not exist[ed].”

Yes, art grabs us. It reassures, agitates, engages. It involves memory and perception. And it changes the way people see the world. Remember that as you bring the art of dance to your students and families this year. —Cheryl A. Ossola, Editor in Chief

Two Thumbs Up
The temptation was too much. The awe-inspiring Bolshoi in a spanking-new Sleeping Beauty starring the-most-famous-employee-in-the-world David Hallberg—every sequin, sauté, and squeaky pointe shoe beamed into a cinema near me. I had to be there.

So a friend and I set out to catch the latest Ballet in Cinema offering from Emerging Pictures, a company convinced that dance lovers will brave sticky floors and odd hours to see top companies doing top ballets. We were happy to—and so, I believe, were the seven other people in the theater.

Instead of the usual pre-show fare of previews and commercials we stared at a black screen, listening as the Bolshoi orchestra warmed up. (Definitely an improvement!) When the visual arrived, we were greeted by one of those amazing Europeans who speak 17 languages, chatting about Petipa. Onstage, dancers in layers of costumes and sweats milled about, ripping off quads and relaxing on pointe, waiting for the curtain to rise.

When it did, the audience in the Bolshoi Theater applauded. We in Theater 5 did not, and I must admit I felt vaguely traitorous. Still, it was a very different audience experience to be, at one moment, close enough to see the herald’s eyes narrow at Carabosse’s entrance, then suddenly, sitting somewhere in the third circle, in awe at the corps and their intricate patterns.

When intermission arrived, we were slightly perplexed. The Bolshoi patrons stretched their legs, but since our projectionist had obviously turned on the three-hour broadcast and gone out for a drink, we sat in the dark. For 30 minutes. But then it was Act II and time for David the Great to make his historic entrance.

I have to admit, it wasn’t too different from my usual trip to the ballet—I didn’t get a program and I dozed off during the Act III grand pas de deux. Yet I saw the Bolshoi, larger than life—and live. —Karen White, Associate Editor

Share

Mail

Share

Words from our readers

Thank you for the beautiful article on Young Dancemakers Company [“Show on the Road,” November 2011], so articulately written by Elizabeth Zimmer. It was featured expertly in an especially readable layout, the photos perfectly chosen and placed. I am so grateful to you, Dance Studio Life, and Elizabeth for this opportunity to spread the word so effectively about Young Dancemakers Company.
Alice Teirstein, Founding Director
Young Dancemakers Company
New York, NY


Congratulations to Mrs. Schleifer on a job well done [“Teacher in the Spotlight,” October 2011]. I am one of her former students from Andries Hudde, I.S. 240, in Brooklyn. When I started her class I had never done a live performance and was scared to perform in front of an audience. I was told by Mrs. Schleifer, “If you think it, imagine it, and can achieve it, you can do it. Express yourself!” I had never heard the song “Iko Iko.” Every time I hear that song I think of my days at Hudde and anticipating dance class. Mrs. Schleifer was a big influence in my life as far as music. A big thank-you to Jamee Schleifer for introducing me to expression!
Nadia Powell
Initial L&T Specialist
LeasePlan USA


From Our Facebook Fans:

So inspired to see so much work go into such a worthy cause [“A Shoe Show With Heart,” October 2011]! The ripple effect is always there. We just need more people to throw the first stone! Congratulations on a wonderful show and community service.
Michelle Ballaro
Ballet Arts Center for Dance
Cheektowaga, NY

I enjoyed reading the article [“Dads on Demand,” October 2011]. This story is all about the kind of dancer dad I want to be.
E. Keith Turner

Wonderful article [“The Eye of the Beholder,” October 2011]! My iPod is wonderful for taking a quick video of a step such as a pirouette during class so the student can see what I see. It’s so true that they feel like they are correct, but when they see it they can understand why I gave the notes. And then they are much more driven to correct it!
Christina Munter

Share
Share this page with your dance friends
Share
All Dance Studio Life content

Rhee Gold on Twitter
October 2014
M T W T F S S
« Sep    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031