Bessie Awards Bestows Honors and Awards

On Monday night, two titans in the field were honored at the annual Bessie Awards ceremony: Arthur Mitchell, the founder of Dance Theater of Harlem, with a lifetime achievement award; and Chuck Davis, the founder of DanceAfrica, for service to the field of dance.

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Bankers Dance, Too; After All, They’re Only Human

Dr. Peter Lovatt, the 48-year-old head and founder of the Dance Psychology Lab at the University of Hertfordshire in England, rarely has difficulty convincing people to dance. An article in Men’s Health says his lectures on dance psychology often end with the audience bursting into dance.

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Memory of Mother Lost on 911 Lives on in Daughter’s Dance Studio

Joann Tabeek always encouraged her daughter, Krystal, to follow her dreams, but didn’t live to see Krystal through her 15 years of competitive dance. Working as a vice president and partner at Cantor Fitzgerald on the 103rd floor of the World Trade Center, she was one of the nearly 3,000 people who perished in the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001.

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Savion Glover Performance Interprets Story of Domestic Abuse Victim

As creator of The Maria Project, a theatrical investigation into the 1931 murder of Maria Salazar by her husband, playwright Marcella Goheen took note when the National Domestic Violence Hotline experienced an 84 percent increase in calls after a video leaked in September of football player Ray Rice hitting his then-fiancée in an Atlantic City elevator.

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2 Tips for Modern Teachers | Undercurves, Overcurves

Moving through space is more about the pelvis than the feet. To prepare students to move freely and efficiently through space, I devote time early in each class session to an exploration of pelvic shifts—transferring the weight from one foot to the other with an initiation in the pelvic floor. I call these actions “undercurves” because the lowest part of the pelvis inscribes a U-shaped curve in each transfer of weight.

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EditorSpeak

As the cover makes obvious, with this issue Dance Studio Life celebrates 10 years of publication. I’ve been on board for seven years as editor in chief, but I had a hand in some of the earlier issues as a freelance editor—which means I’ve seen how much the magazine has grown and changed since its inception. The anniversary is Rhee’s topic this month in “On My Mind,” so I won’t say more than this: the most gratifying part of my job is seeing you, our readers, respond with enthusiasm to the magazine’s evolution. Our goal is to make a difference, helping you develop as business owners and teaching artists, and offering you new paths to creativity. Like you, we take our work seriously, and that’s as it should be.

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FYI

When David Palmer was a little boy growing up in a remote, TV-free area of Fiji, books like Dr. Seuss’ Green Eggs and Ham engaged his imagination and taught him to love language. So when Palmer, associate artistic director of The Washington Ballet, transformed this beloved classic into a ballet, he didn’t leave language behind.

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On My Mind

Ten years. It’s quite a milestone to be celebrating, especially for a supposedly doomed publication.

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Classroom Connection

My dad always asks me one thing about my dances,” announced Angela. “Am I in the front row?” This set off an impassioned discussion among dancers in my 9-to 12-year-old jazz class, and it became clear that where they are placed onstage determines how they value themselves as dancers.

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Mail

The article [“Viva Villella!” March/April 2014] was a great tribute to Edward Villella. Yes, viva Villella! I had the pleasure of meeting him at a Dance Masters of America National Convention.

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Bright Biz Idea | Three Sources, One (Income) Stream

Dance studio owners face the ever-present challenge of managing cash flow and turning a profit—to pay rent, pay teacher and staff salaries, and, hopefully, to pay themselves. Nick Waynelovich and his daughter Kimberly Williams have not only found a way to build a profitable dance and performing-arts organization, they have developed two additional income streams that keep the organization on top of its bills.

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Dancing on the Pier

If you still view Facebook as primarily a pastime for young people, you have another think coming. Chris Collins, who runs a studio in Alexandria, Virginia (see “Teacher in the Spotlight,” September 2013), and admits to “approaching 60,” has used the social media site since 2009 to rally alumni of Tony Grant Stars of Tomorrow, a children’s revue that played in the 1,700-seat Midway Theater on Atlantic City’s Steel Pier every summer from 1947 through 1978.

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From Swing to Hoedown

In the Lone Star State, Texas A&M University’s Aggie Wranglers have achieved legendary status. Whenever this exhibition country-and-western dance team, established and run by Texas A&M students, performs at half-time shows or Disney World, on cruise ships, or even in Qatar, their routines—blending swing, polka, and hoedown moves, with complex partnering—bring down the house. Since 1999, a former Aggie Wranglers dancer, Sharon Toups, has passed along that couples-dance style to kids ages 5 to 18, who have achieved celebrity status in their own right.

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Rhee in Retrospect

Ten-year-old Rhee Gold’s mother, Sherry, looked at him. “Go sit under a tree and write something.” Rhee thought that sounded like the stupidest thing he’d ever heard. But he did it, and he discovered that he liked to write.

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The Dance Studio Life “Generous Heart” Awards

A 10th anniversary deserves a nod. We’ve given ourselves one in several ways: by devoting this issue, in part, to marking Dance Studio Life’s launch date with a retrospective by publisher Rhee Gold and by giving the magazine a fresh look with a major redesign. But we’ve done something else that we hope will have even more lasting effect: we’ve established a new annual tradition: the Dance Studio Life “Generous Heart” Awards.

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With the Greatest of Ease

Flying through the air with the greatest of ease, flipping across the floor, folding into impossible pretzels—how many dancers have watched a Cirque du Soleil show and thought, “Maybe I could try that”? At Dance & Circus Arts of Tampa Bay, a 15-year-old school located in Clearwater, Florida, the serious approach to dance training offered by many studios applies in equal measure to circus arts training.

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