EditorSpeak

As the cover makes obvious, with this issue Dance Studio Life celebrates 10 years of publication. I’ve been on board for seven years as editor in chief, but I had a hand in some of the earlier issues as a freelance editor—which means I’ve seen how much the magazine has grown and changed since its inception. The anniversary is Rhee’s topic this month in “On My Mind,” so I won’t say more than this: the most gratifying part of my job is seeing you, our readers, respond with enthusiasm to the magazine’s evolution. Our goal is to make a difference, helping you develop as business owners and teaching artists, and offering you new paths to creativity. Like you, we take our work seriously, and that’s as it should be.

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Bright Biz Idea | Three Sources, One (Income) Stream

Dance studio owners face the ever-present challenge of managing cash flow and turning a profit—to pay rent, pay teacher and staff salaries, and, hopefully, to pay themselves. Nick Waynelovich and his daughter Kimberly Williams have not only found a way to build a profitable dance and performing-arts organization, they have developed two additional income streams that keep the organization on top of its bills.

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The Dance Studio Life “Generous Heart” Awards

A 10th anniversary deserves a nod. We’ve given ourselves one in several ways: by devoting this issue, in part, to marking Dance Studio Life’s launch date with a retrospective by publisher Rhee Gold and by giving the magazine a fresh look with a major redesign. But we’ve done something else that we hope will have even more lasting effect: we’ve established a new annual tradition: the Dance Studio Life “Generous Heart” Awards.

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Wall Explains How SYTYCD Career Began With Determination and an Apology

Toddlers tend not to be the most dedicated dance students, but Travis Wall, who started taking classes at his mom Denise Wall’s Virginia Beach dance studio as soon as he could walk, was an exception. “I would behave in class. Sometimes you put a 2-year-old in a class, and they’re screaming and kicking. I was so focused and ready to go. I wanted to learn so much,” Wall tells Co.Create.

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August 2014 | Write It Down

Choreography has become a never-ending task for studio teachers, which means they’re on a relentless quest for quality music and fresh inspiration. They face overwhelming pressure to outdo the previous year’s work and meet the expectations of students and their parents. Choreographers need to acquire a vast amount of music and fill thousands of counts with movement, all while showcasing the specific strengths of their students. Often, these demands lead them to rush the choreographic process.

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August 2014 | Ask Rhee Gold

My competition students are at odds with each other. They are starting to get cliquey, with two different tribe-like groups. One is a group of great kids who are not the best dancers, yet they give it their all and get better all the time, like most students do. The other is a clique of those who think they are the best, and even among them there are some harsh feelings.

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Changing Interpretation of Tax Law Hits Missouri Studio with $73,000 Back Tax Bill

For 40 years, a sales tax was never collected at Miss Dianna’s School of Dance in Kansas City because it was considered a place of education, said owner Dianna Pfaff. But the Missouri Department of Revenue is stepping up enforcement of sales tax on places of amusement, entertainment, or recreation, and dance practice might now fall under that category, reports FoxKC.com.

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Mindful Marketing | Target Audiences

Your biggest competition isn’t the studio down the street; it’s the other activities that vie for our students’ attention. With a vast array of afterschool activities available to most kids, it’s more important than ever to create a sense of urgency and excitement about your dance studio’s registration season. Delivering unique messages to different target audiences can move potential clients from inaction to action when it comes to registration and commitment.

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Ballet Scene | Shuffles and Chassés

You wouldn’t expect to find tap among the offerings at Thomas Armour Youth Ballet, a Miami studio rooted in ballet since 1951. But today this classical ballet school, formerly called The Miami Conservatory, encourages students ages 7 and up to study tap and ballet; for the members of its Tap Team, both forms of dance are required. The result? A win-win scenario.

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Bright Biz Idea | Time vs Money

To keep a studio running, an owner must constantly make decisions based on the perceived value of services. Is that master teacher worth her pricey salary? Will a costly renovation be worth the time and effort? How much of a return will a professional marketing campaign yield? But many owners neglect to consider the value of one critical ingredient of business success—their own time.

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Come Together

A dance studio isn’t like an office. Without a conference room and water cooler, your teaching staff may not even meet one another until recital time. Working alone, they may miss out on the expertise of their peers and feel disconnected from the studio. That’s why it’s important to hold regular staff meetings. Done right, these meetings can be a highlight of working for your studio.

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In With the New

Transitions are often difficult. In the case of schools changing ownership, there are worries, often realistic, about staff turnover, student attrition, and resistance from parents about new policies. But when Kari Fisher, a dance teacher with no experience running a school, suddenly became a studio owner, the results were positive. Rather than losing students, within one year, Fisher says, enrollment at the newly christened Synergy Dance Academy in Madison, Wisconsin, had grown by 60 students; another 35 have enrolled since then. She retained her teaching staff and implemented successful new programs and classes.

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