July 2015 | Teacher in the Spotlight | Anna Marie Leo

Photo by Ean Mosser

NOMINATED BY: Gail Skinner and Amelia Kinsolving, Leo’s lifelong friends and fellow teachers: “At the 2013 DanceLife Teacher Conference, we were amazed by the number of people who approached Miss Anna Marie to tell her what a great influence she had on them. At the age of 84—and as her studio enters its 64th year—Anna Marie continues to teach, always willing to share her talents with students and fellow studio owners alike.”

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July 2015 | On My Mind

Photo by Mim Adkins

In this issue’s “Ask Rhee Gold” column, I advise a school owner on how to approach a delicate situation. You’ve all encountered complex issues among your students’ families—divorces, deaths, substance abuse, and so on. But as our world changes, so do its complexities. The question this woman asked isn’t one that any of us would have heard even five years ago, but it’s likely to become more common.

The advice sought was about how to respond to—and how to explain to other students and their parentsa young transgender student’s request to be recognized as Jessica rather than as Josh.

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July 2015 | 2 Music Tips for Teachers | The Classical Period: Part 4

Photo courtesy Nina Pinzarrone

The polka was the second most important couple dance (after the waltz) in classical-period ballrooms. In 2/4 meter, the polka originated in Bohemia as a peasant dance.

Also in 2/4 meter, the galop, named after the running gait of a horse, is a lively country dance introduced in Paris at the Carnival of 1829 by the Duchesse de Berry.

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July 2015 | 2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Freezes and Levels

Photo by Bill H

Freezes (also called pauses or poses) are the moments in breaking when the dancer stops all movement—as if frozen in time. Freezes can happen at any point and must be held with confidence.

The use of levels—high, middle, and low—is one of the fundamental elements of dance.

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July 2015 | Thinking Out Loud | Speaking With Sensitivity

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In less than nine months, I have had to notify my studio’s staff that two students’ mothers had died. A second-grader lost her mother to cervical cancer, and a seventh-grader lost hers to leukemia. I was saddened to think how much these two young girls were suffering—but their losses also made me reflect on my own behavior. How many times, as the owner of a studio that is dominated by girls and their mothers, would I use language like “Moms Only” or “Mom Volunteer” without realizing how thoughtless it might seem?

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July 2015 | Say What?

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Most dance teachers have to talk—a lot. You communicate regularly with children, parents, business associates, and adult learners, to name a few, and among them are the young, the old, the polite, the funny, the argumentative, and the easygoing. Some of that communication happens by email, texting, or social media, but when you’re in a dance studio your voice is all you’ve got. It has to be clear and it has to be heard.

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July 2015 | 2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | Moving Into Attitude Derrière & Développé

Photo by Becky Montalvo

I frequently end barre combinations with a pirouette into attitude derrière. It’s good for students to feel the passé-to-attitude transition and practice balancing out of it. Left unchecked, however, students may contort their torsos and lean toward the barre trying to get the attitude leg up high.

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July 2015 |2 Tips for Modern & Contemporary Teachers | Listening and Tuning In

Photo by Ingrid Werthmann

Teaching musicality is vital to help your students grow from dancers into artists. Whether music is live or recorded, encourage them to listen to it, and to understand that music and movement are partners and support each other.

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July 2015 | FYI

What’s up in the dance community
Luigi: A Life of Influence and Inspiration
Renowned Teacher Maggie Black Dies

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July 2015 | 2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Teaching Musicality

Photo by Robert Rosen

Teaching students to respond to and connect with music is as important in tap as it is in other forms of dance. As tappers, our students are “joining the band,” and each sound they make adds to the overall musical arrangement.

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May-June 2015 | On My Mind

Photo by Mim Adkins

Honest. Trustworthy. We all label ourselves with those words, and that’s a good start. Next up: having the integrity to prove them true.

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May-June 2015 | 2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | Controlling Pirouettes

Photo by Becky Montalvo

When a student’s upper body is not active in a pirouette, the turn itself begins to suffer. It’s not only important to maintain a turned-out passé, high relevé, and strong spot; a dancer’s torso (the back and core muscles) must also be engaged throughout the turn.

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May-June 2015 | 2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Shuffles

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The shuffle—a brush and spank, done in all directions and in varied rhythms—is one of the most important movements in a tap dancer’s repertoire.

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May-June 2015 | 2 Tips for Modern & Contemporary Teachers | Fluidity and Strength

Photo by Ingrid Werthmann

I love watching a dancer move with such fluidity that it looks effortless. Fluidity gives watchers the sense that the dancer can do anything.

Building physical strength in students’ bodies is essential both for conveying power and supporting fluidity.

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May-June 2015 | 2 Music Tips for Teachers | The Classical Period: Part 3

Photo courtesy Nina Pinzarrone

In ballet class, waltz music is excellent for almost any exercise, from tendus, pliés, and ronds de jambe to grand allegros.

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May-June 2015 | Teacher in the Spotlight | Joan “Ms. Puffy” Lather

Photo courtesy Patricia Leigh Dwyer

NOMINATED BY: Patricia Leigh Dwyer, former student: “At 82, Ms. Puffy continues to make her mark on the dance world by touching young dancers’ lives. Her creativity is endless, her energy is electric, and she has a warm, loving way of drawing you into her world of music, wonder, and movement. I am proud, not only to have studied under her tutelage, but to have carried on her legacy—as thousands of teachers across the country continue to do.”

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May-June 2015 | Ballet Scene | Teacher Transformation

Khilea Douglass, a teacher at Lula Washington Dance Theatre, says Project Plie has given her new teaching tools; an awareness of structure and child development. Photo by Mesiyah McGinnis

When American Ballet Theatre initiated its outreach program Project Plié in 2013, the company’s CEO, Rachel Moore, was clear about the lack of diversity in ballet schools and companies and the need to mitigate the problem. “My observation is that currently in the U.S. none of the major ballet companies have a female principal dancer of color,” says Moore. “I think it’s a real problem because American ballet companies should look like America. As the demographics of this country change, in order for ballet companies to remain relevant, we need to change with them.”

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May-June 2015 | 2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Shuffles and Funky Four Corners

Photo by Bill H

Shuffles are a type of footwork in breaking.

The funky four corners is a toprock step pattern in breaking.

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March-April 2015 | 2 Music Tips for Teachers | The Classical Period: Part 2

Photo courtesy Nina Pinzarrone

When using a piece of music for class or choreography, it’s helpful to understand its form. Two important musical forms created by 18th-century composers are the sonata and rondo forms.

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March-April 2015 | 2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Drop-Freeze and Dolphin Dive

Photo by Bill H

The drop-freeze to the back is an important basic ground move…

The dolphin dive is a ground move seen mainly in house/loft movement…

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March-April 2015 | 2 Tips for Modern & Contemporary Teachers | Focus and Shaping Momentum

Photo by Ingrid Werthmann

Training an awareness of focus is a vital part of developing students into dancers and artists.

I sometimes see students emphasizing either shape, form, and line, or momentum, energy, and dynamics, instead of integrating them. To address this, I use the idea of “shaping momentum.”

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March-April 2015 | 2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Soft Shoe

Photo by Robert Rosen

Soft shoe should be integral to all tap curriculums. Appropriate for all levels and ages, studying soft shoe increases awareness of tempo, tone, and placement. Originally done in soft shoes, sometimes on sand, this style is known for a slow, dignified, and graceful approach, made popular in the vaudeville years by George Primrose and in the 1930s and 1940s by the artists known as “class acts.” A famous routine is Honi Coles and Cholly Atkins’ slow soft shoe, known for its beautiful precision and incredibly slow tempo.

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March-April 2015 | 2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | Finger Turns

Photo by Becky Montalvo

For successful finger turns, it’s important for the female partner to ronde de jambe her working leg a full 90 degrees, from devant to à la seconde, before pulling it back into a turned-out passé.

As pairs practice, have them work together to find equal opposing force between the female dancer’s supporting arm and the male dancer’s push-off arm.

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March-April 2015 | Teacher in the Spotlight | Ellen Dyer

Photo courtesy River Oaks Dance

“I own a dance program that caters to children ages 3 to 8, and Ellen has been an integral part from day one. She performs in many theater productions in the Houston area, and brings that energy and animation into class. I know my program wouldn’t be as successful without her dedication.”

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February 2015 | Teens in Trouble

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As a dance teacher, I have come across teens struggling with serious issues. I have also encountered parents reluctant to seek treatment for their child. In dealing with each situation, I used several rules to guide my actions. I also consulted Deborah Lynn, MD, an adult and child psychoanalyst with a private practice in Los Angeles who serves on the Volunteer Clinical Faculty at UCLA. Here are some of the ways I’ve learned to handle these difficult situations.

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February 2015 | 2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | Glissades in Petit Allegro

Photo by Becky Montalvo

Glissades are common connecting steps for jumps and therefore important for students to master. There are two major types: 1) glissades in petit allegro, which close in fifth position, and 2) glissades in medium or grand allegro, which failli through fifth to end in or continue through fourth position.

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February 2015 | 2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Swing’s the Thing

Photo by Robert Rosen

“It don’t mean a thing if it ain’t got that swing,” go the words of Duke Ellington’s popular tune. So how do we teach our tap students to swing?

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February 2015 | 2 Tips for Modern & Contemporary Teachers | Arms and Legacies

Photo by Ingrid Werthmann

Arms are often students’ last concern. They’re concentrating on legs and core, so their arm movements seem unfinished or like afterthoughts.

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February 2015 | 2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Basic Top Rock and Imagery

Photo by Bill H

1) To teach basic top rock, start with the two-step. A two-step can happen on either foot and move in any direction. 2) Use the mental images conjured up by dance and step names, such as popping and locking, to help your students feel the hip-hop aesthetic in their bodies.

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February 2015 | 2 Music Tips for Teachers | The Classical Period: Part 1

Photo courtesy Nina Pinazarrone

Classical music is art music based on the traditions of Western music, from the 11th century to the present day. Often more complex than folk or popular music, it requires technical mastery and a sophistication of form.

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February 2015 | Teacher in the Spotlight | Chauniece Conner Thompson

Chauniece Thompson makes sure students such as Morgan Rucker are prepared for every dance opportunity. Photo by Antoine Lever

NOMINATED BY: Joy Sheffield, friend: “Chauniece opened Ballet on Wheels in 2002 to help build a better Memphis community through dance. Chauniece ensures her students are well-prepared for every dance opportunity. She gives her dance staff full discretion in their classrooms and encourages them to come up with innovative ideas to engage students in the classroom and through community-based dance programs. She’s making a positive impact on her students, staff, and community.”

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February 2015 | Table of Contents

February 2015

This month we focus on wellness, of both mind and body. Gone are the days of harsh teaching methods that promoted unhealthy mindsets; today there are widespread efforts to make dance training good for body and soul. You’ll discover how one school tends to both, how a team of dancers delivers Mindful Practice to private studios, and how to help teens in trouble.

Plus, month-by-month business goals, paving the way for freshman dance majors, post-performance feedback at USA IBC, our annual roundup of teacher training options, and more.

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January 2015 | Teacher in the Spotlight | Lisa Eisemann

Photo by Maria Graziano

NOMINATED BY: Maria Graziano: “Lisa is not only a role model for dancers, but for our entire community. Her studio has strict rules and her classes are full year round. She runs three dance companies, and the studio is home to children with autism and those with handicaps and learning disabilities. I am a stage crew mom, and I have seen and heard Lisa working with students, demanding their best behavior, and encouraging all of them regardless of ability.”

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January 2015 | Breath, Energy, Soul

Jung Im Lee trained in Korean dance in Seoul from childhood. Photo courtesy Jung Im Lee

One block from the Empire State Building, in a building that houses the Korean Performing Arts Center, Korean dance teacher and performer Rebecca Lee is rehearsing two teenage dancers in the ipchum (translated variously as “standing dance,” “basic dance,” or “improvisational folk dance”), a simple traditional Korean dance.

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January 2015 | Bright Biz Idea | Dance on the Go

Children at 45 childcare centers take weekly classes from the Dance…Dance…Dance…teaching team. Photo by a.jo Fotografi

Dance teacher Marisa Rotter’s weekly schedule reads like a tour of the Minneapolis suburbs. If it’s Monday it’s time to go to Farmington. If it’s Tuesday she’s shuttling between Burnsville, Apple Valley, and Northfield. On Thursday it’s back to Farmington.

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January 2015 | Table of Contents

January 2015

A World of Dance Volume 20 | Issue 1 | Buy a print copy It’s time for our New Year’s tradition—sharing stories about dance from a global perspective. This month we’re taking you to France for ballet, to Korea for traditional and contemporary dance, and to the Middle East to . . .

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January 2015 | Fun and Games

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Most teachers of musical theater classes have had students who are hesitant to commit to new acting challenges. Maybe they’re shy or intimidated; maybe they question their ability to do improvisational exercises. It’s not easy to get all of your students invested in something new—but if you want your dancers to take a risk, you’ve got to be willing to put yourself on the line.

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January 2015 | 2 Tips for Ballet Teachers | Diagonals and Pirouettes

Photo by Becky Montalvo

We teach beginning dancers to face the corners of the room squarely when in effacé and croisé. As dancers become more advanced, they will need to adjust to facing along a flatter diagonal.

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January 2015 | 2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Mixed Levels

We may try to keep our classrooms homogeneous in skill level, but we’re still likely to end up welcoming new students into classes for which they don’t have all the prerequisite skills. In tap classes, this is especially challenging. Emphasizing all teaching modalities to reinforce new vocabulary and skills will help all your dancers succeed.

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January 2015 | 2 Tips for Modern & Contemporary Dance Teachers | Risk-Taking and Groundedness

I sometimes sense my students moving hesitantly in class, doubting themselves and shying away from risk-taking. To address this, I tell them to ask themselves these questions in class when they feel unsure: “What is there to lose? What could go wrong? Do I trust myself enough to figure it out if I, say, turn the wrong way?” Their bodies are smarter than they realize: they don’t need to sabotage themselves by worrying about major catastrophes.

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January 2015 | 2 Tips for Hip-Hop Teachers | Grooves and “Indian” Step

An important concept in hip-hop is “keeping the groove.” The groove is the constant pulsing movement of the body, which corresponds to the feel of the music.

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January 2015 | 2 Music Tips for Teachers | The Baroque Period: Part 3

In a baroque suite, optional movements were often inserted between the third (sarabande) and fourth (gigue) movements. The lively minuet, in 3/4 or 3/8 meter, was the most popular. Introduced at court in the reign of Louis XIV, this French dance derived from the branle of Poitou, a rustic dance. With short, delicate steps, turned-out leg positions, broken-wrist affectations, and elegant bows, and the dancers in heeled shoes and powdered wigs, the minuet epitomized the artificial behavior of court life. Each melodic phrase was six counts long to accommodate the pas de menuet step pattern (three steps of two beats each).

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December 2014| Hip-Hop Lineup

All dance studio owners strive to find excellent teachers to fill their faculty rosters. Yet it is not uncommon for owners to crave more variety for students—to provide a roster of instructors similar to those of professional studios in large markets such as Los Angeles or New York City. At Wildwood Dance & Arts, located in America’s heartland near St. Louis, Missouri, owner Leah Cordiano-Siemens has found a solution to the need to broaden her hip-hop offerings: she typically brings in at least one guest teacher each month. In so doing, she exposes developing dancers to current dance steps and choreography and gives them a taste of the world of professional dance.

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December 2014 | Jazz Duet

The Marta sisters, by their own description “joined at the hip,” came to the United States from Colón, Panama, as teenagers in 1965. Both became dancers, and then teachers. Many years later they’re still at work, Elvia Marta in San Francisco and Cecilia Marta in New York City.

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December 2014 | 2 Music Tips for Dance Teachers | The Baroque Period: Part 2

Many baroque composers wrote multi-movement instrumental pieces known as suites, inspired by national folk dances of the period. The movements were generally in the same key (tonality) and were relatively short, yet they differed in tempo, meter, and style. The phrases were symmetrical and balanced harmonically to accommodate dance patterns.

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