Posts Tagged ‘time’

Teacher Tune-Up | Just Be

by Sandi Duncan In this ever-changing landscape of life, we may find ourselves constantly on the go, working to complete as many tasks and goals as the day will allow. If your to-do list is longer than your leg and multitasking is a way of life, you may be in need of some time to…

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Ask Rhee Gold | Lesson Planning

Advice for Dance Teachers Dear Rhee, Do you have a solid estimate of how much time teachers should spend on class planning per class? I know it varies depending on the discipline, but I’m trying to help my two full-time staff members figure out what portion of their work week can reasonably be spent on…

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October 2015 | Page Turners

Books of note (new and not)
1. A Time to Dance
2. Tallulah’s Solo
3. Ballet Spectacular: A Young Ballet Lover’s Guide and an Insight Into a Magical World
4. Creative Dance for All Ages (2nd ed.)

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May-June 2015 | Higher-Ed Voice | Continental Drift

The first thing choreographers do in making a dance is to bring bodies together at a designated time and space. The space might be a ballroom, a studio, a park green, a subway platform—anywhere large enough and light enough to move in. Then the choreographer can turn to making dance. In the process, everyone breathes the same air, touches one another, and mingles sweat in face-to-face encounters—intimate, damp, and physical. Regardless of the kind of dance being made, the choreographer and her dancers share the experience in the same space and time.

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December 2014 | 2 Tips for Tap Teachers | Time Steps

Time steps are a pattern, usually reversed every 4 counts, used by vaudevillians to help set tempo for musicians. In Over the Top to Bebop, a filmed discussion of tap with Jazz Dance author Marshall Stearns, Honi Coles talks about time steps being the “ABCs” of tap dance, and he and Cholly Atkins vocalize a ditty about a buggy ride to demonstrate simple to more complex rhythms. (Portions are on YouTube.)

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September 2014 | Mind Games

Dance teachers can benefit from understanding the difference between what sports psychologists label “process-oriented thinking” and “result-oriented thinking.” I translate these terms as playing a “win–win” or “win–lose” game.

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