Posts Tagged ‘Jerome Robbins’

Editor Speak | The Genius Myth

When a raft of sexual harassment and physical abuse allegations surfaced in December against Peter Martins, ballet master in chief of New York City Ballet, I was first shocked, then not surprised (hello, ballet world!). Then I thought, if Balanchine were alive now, he’d be in big trouble. No one, as far as I know,…

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Bolshoi Ballet on the Big Screen

Using live performance cinema as a teaching tool by Joseph Carman Few experiences educate a dancer like seeing an inspiring program of live dance. When a budding ballerina witnesses a world-class ballerina dancing onstage, a dream crystallizes. Second to that, seeing one of the Bolshoi Ballet in Cinema productions, broadcast from Moscow’s Bolshoi Theatre into…

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All That’s Jazz

Born in America at the beginning of the 20th century, jazz dance melds the spirit of improvisation with the discipline of applied technique in a style that constantly redefines and reinvents itself. Jazz dance is seen on stages and in movies, on streets and in clubs; it is taught in dance studios and researched at universities. Its history engages both the past and present in a uniquely American way.

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Thinking Out Loud | Memories of a Master

My first experience with Jerry came as a 10-yearold. I was chosen to be Cupid in Mother Goose. My task was to lead Prince Charming to the fairy princess and shoot her in the heart with my magic arrow. I was onstage for all of 3 minutes, a seemingly unimportant child’s role that a ballet master could no doubt teach. Robbins taught it himself as he would later teach Fancy Free and Dances at a Gathering: so that I recognized the importance, filling me with images of my character’s motivation and a sense of my larger responsibility to the plot and success of the ballet. He reminded me of the dangers of twigs snapping under my clumsy foot or of rustled leaves waking the dormant princess. He instilled in me an importance of our work in the studio, his and mine, not my work for him, which is more how I would have seen it.

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