Posts Tagged ‘parent’

Safe Spaces

Smart ways to handle backstage access during recitals by Heather Wisner With so much happening onstage during recitals, it could be easy to miss what’s happening backstage. But for the sake of security—not to mention organization—it’s vital to have a plan in place to control backstage access. Dance Studio Life spoke with studio owners across…

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Making the Message Heard

Studios have many ways to communicate with clients—but is anyone listening? by Jill Randall Teachers and studio owners alike do figurative leaps, turns, and jumps to make sure that families have all the information they need about performances, rehearsals, costume fittings, open classes/parent observations, field trips, weather-related cancellations, and registration for the next season. But…

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Wearing It Well | Clients Are Sold on Seasonal Show Rental Program

by Heather Turbeville What’s better than a holiday show with Sugar Plum fairies, penguins, and peppermint patties? A holiday show that doesn’t require students to buy all of those costumes. All 200 students at Dance With Miss Lindsay in Palm Springs, California, rent costumes that range from T-shirts and leggings to platter tutus with sequined…

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Ask Rhee Gold | Thank-you card etiquette

Advice for Dance Teachers Hi Rhee, This year I started working at a new studio, and was overwhelmed with gifts at Christmas. I spent almost two hours writing thank-you notes, then started to panic about forgetting someone or overlooking a gift, and maybe causing offense. In one small class I received gifts from all students…

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Ask Rhee Gold | The Importance of the Recital

Advice for dance teachers | The Importance of the Recital Dear Rhee, At the end of last season, I had parents who were upset because they thought the recital experience was too much trouble. One parent actually sent me an email to say her child would not be returning unless I decided to drop the…

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July 2017 | Ask Rhee Gold | Competition Programs

Advice for dance teachers | Competition Programs Dear Rhee, At what age do you believe a child should begin a competition program? We’ve always started at 10; now parents are asking me if I will accept kids as young as 6. I don’t know if the children and their parents are prepared for the amount…

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July 2017 | On My Mind

Words from the publisher I recently traveled to Glendale, Arizona, to present weekend seminars at the Spisak Dance Academy. It was a different seminar experience than most I’ve had, because I got to work with everyone involved—the faculty, the students, and their parents. The kids and the teachers were easy for me, but the parents…

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May-June 2017 | High Fidelity

When it comes to keeping dance parents happy, offering a comfortable atmosphere, family-friendly events, and warm customer service can be as important as hiring good teachers or winning competition trophies. Parents want to see their children fulfilled, of course, but they’re also bound to appreciate efforts that acknowledge their own value to the studio and help simplify their busy lives.

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November 2016 | Bright Biz Idea | Have Baby, Will Bourrée

by Christina Raymond

Smart studio owners are always looking for ways to reach an untapped market. Babywearing dance classes—in which the dancers take class with baby on board, via a front-pack or sling—provide parents with the earliest possible introduction to your school as well as a heartwarming experience.

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October 2016 | EditorSpeak

“Recital Memories”: The recitals of my childhood blur together.

“Offense, Not Defense”: A teacher’s life is one of lessons learned. Forgive me that cliché, but it’s true. Most of these lessons hit hard, but as you get older—if you are supple and reflective—you might find a trick or two among the bruises.

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February 2016 | EditorSpeak

“Training Thinking Dancers”: Rehearsals had begun for my new musical theater competition number, but nothing was working. These girls had been with me for years—they trusted my “nobody’s gonna get this” themes, solved the puzzle of my patterns, could ace any acting improv. They were ready for a real challenge—or so I thought.

“When Helping Hurts”: Above, Karen says, “I became the parent who does the homework.” This mentality—the determination to not let a child fail in ways that are necessary for learning to be a responsible adult—is prevalent and nothing new. But it’s gaining ground in new ways.

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May-June 2015 | On My Mind

Honest. Trustworthy. We all label ourselves with those words, and that’s a good start. Next up: having the integrity to prove them true.

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November 2014 | Dancing a Mile in Their Shoes

When Tim Murray brought his 3-year-old daughter to dance class, he was met with a surprise: it was parent participation day. With some trepidation, he dove into class, practicing pliés and tippy-toeing, surrounded by a flock of what he called “little pink, fluffy ducklings” and their mothers. Murray’s experience in his daughter’s class at Joanne Grace School of Dance, in Fairy Meadow, New South Wales, Australia, was in turn mortifying, challenging, and enlightening—so much so that he went on to publish a blog post about it on mamamia.com.au: “The one thing this dad never expected when he dropped his daughter at ballet.”

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May-June 2014 | Before the Goodbye

It happens several times a year: a mom calls my office to say her child “just doesn’t want to come any more.” At such times, I feel like I have failed as a teacher, failed to engage the child, failed to bring her the joy of movement I experience in dance. But recently I have become frustrated. While I don’t expect every child to spend years studying dance, I suspect something more significant is going on than a child discovering that dance “isn’t her thing.”

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October 2013 | From the Outside Looking In

As dance educators, we all know what goes into making a recital happen—months of work and organizational effort—ours, as well as that of our staff and volunteers. When showtime comes, we see the magic happen from our vantage point in the wings. But what about the view from the “outside”: from the parents who shuttle kids to and from rehearsals, the young dancer who tries on her first dab of lipstick? What do students and parents think about the recital experience?

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October 2013 | Seamless Show Strategies

For many dance teachers, the greatest reward at recital time is seeing the infectious grins of their students as they show off a year’s worth of hard work. But the fact that the performers are enjoying themselves does not mean that audience members are equally delighted. Even the most enthusiastic dancers and dynamic choreography lose their charm when viewers spend too much time in their seats. What should be an entertaining, high-energy event can become a disjointed, four-hour affair with parents questioning the tuition they pay and relatives constantly glancing at their watches.

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September 2013 | Positive Dance Competitions:

Ask dance studio owners, teachers, or parents what their role is in prepping students for competition, and they’ll tell you it’s up to them to set the right tone. For the people quoted here, establishing priorities, emphasizing learning opportunities, and having fun top the list of essential ingredients for a positive competition experience.

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July 2013 | Mindful Marketing | Blogging Basics

School owners, like anyone who owns a business that involves “face time,” understand the importance of good communication, and most of them put it at the top of their priority list. But if you’re like most school owners, you probably don’t have a chance to talk with every person who walks into the studio, and you might not have time to have a long conversation with each new parent. You certainly don’t get to chat with every person who clicks through your website. But there’s a work-around: blogging gives you the opportunity to have these conversations virtually.

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September 2010 | Hold the Glitter

I have read wonderfully insightful articles about the struggles of children whose dance teacher is their parent, such as “My Life as a Studio Owner’s Daughter,” in the January 2009 issue of this magazine. All children who live in the shadow of a parent with a dance studio experience both struggles and advantages. But what of their non-dancing siblings? What kind of pressures and problems do they face when they don’t share that world?

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December 2009 | Thinking Out Loud | Proud Papa

The little girl on the end of the line is crying hysterically. Another girl is watching the child beside her, who seems to be the only member of the baby ballet group who knows every move. At least she’s making it appear that she knows all the moves. There are missteps, stumbles, and several tots who simply stand in place during the entire number. The scenario could be from any beginning number at any dance school anywhere. But one thing is certain: The crowd loves it.

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Taming the Hypercompetitive Parent

You work hard in class and rehearsals, spending time and energy to produce exciting, creative choreography, all to make the performing experience a good one for your students. You might have visions of grateful parents, happy with the benefits you provide for your students. But sometimes the parents themselves present a roadblock to a good outcome.

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